Prosecuting International Crimes and Human Rights Abuses Committed Against Children: Leading International Court Cases [Hardback]

  • Formāts: Hardback, 1132 pages, height x width x depth: 235x155x46 mm, weight: 1656 g, XXVIII, 1132 p.
  • Izdošanas datums: 19-Nov-2009
  • Izdevniecība: Springer-Verlag Berlin and Heidelberg GmbH & Co. K
  • ISBN-10: 3642005179
  • ISBN-13: 9783642005176
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  • Formāts: Hardback, 1132 pages, height x width x depth: 235x155x46 mm, weight: 1656 g, XXVIII, 1132 p.
  • Izdošanas datums: 19-Nov-2009
  • Izdevniecība: Springer-Verlag Berlin and Heidelberg GmbH & Co. K
  • ISBN-10: 3642005179
  • ISBN-13: 9783642005176
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
This casebook addresses selected precedent-setting rulings of various international human rights and international criminal courts with a focus on the child victims of international crimes and human rights abuses. The cases are analysed from the children's human rights perspective and the question is examined as to what extent the aforementioned courts are according these children justice. The scope of the book is thus limited to the consideration of these representative important cases concerning violations of (a) international human rights and humanitarian law and (b) international criminal law involving child victims and the judicial remedies accorded or denied these victims and their family members. This is not in any way to diminish the suffering and importance of the adult victims of violations of fundamental human rights and grave international crimes. Rather, the book is intended to deal with the restricted and largely neglected topic of to what extent international courts are attending to the implications of there being child victims with respect to the courts' addressing and handling of, among other matters, the following: (a) the con?rmation of charges relating to child-speci?c international crimes (i. e. recruitment of child soldiers, forced child marriage etc.
Part I: An Introduction to the Organizational Structure, Enabling Statutes or Conventions, Case Processing Procedure, and Jurisdiction of the International Courts
The Inter-American Human Rights System
3(34)
The Inter-American Human Rights Commission
4(23)
History of the Inter-American Human Rights Commission
4(1)
The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Under the New Commission Rules
4(4)
Conventions
8(6)
The American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man
14(1)
Petitioning the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights Regarding Alleged Human Rights Violations of the American Convention on Human Rights (ACHR), the Additional Protocols to the ACHR and Other Applicable Conventions or the Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man (Rules in Force as of January 1, 2003)
15(12)
Inter-American Court of Human Rights
27(10)
Organization of the Court
27(2)
Adjudicative Function of the Court
29(4)
The Advisory Function of the Court
33(1)
Summary of Selected Key Procedural Steps for Case Processing Under the Inter-American Human Rights System
33(4)
European International Human Rights Court System
37(18)
The Council of Europe and the European Court of Human Rights
37(1)
The European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms and the Rights of Minors
38(1)
The Structure of the European Court of Human Rights
39(3)
The Sections
40(1)
The Chamber (Lower Court)
40(1)
The Grand Chamber: Re-hears Selected Cases De Novo Post-chamber Judgment or Hears Selected Cases that Have Been Referred to It Directly by ``the Chamber'' (no Chamber Judgment)
41(1)
Jurisdiction
42(1)
Enforcement
43(1)
European Court of Human Rights Case Processing System
43(5)
Petitioning the European Court of Human Rights
43(1)
The Admissibility Decision Made by Committee or by ``the Chamber''
44(1)
The Separate Vs. Joint Procedure by ``the Chamber''
45(1)
Negotiating a ``Friendly Settlement''
45(1)
Case Admissibility Criteria
45(2)
Consideration of the Admissibility and the Merits in the Lower Chamber
47(1)
Re-hearing De Novo by the Grand Chamber on Petition by One or Both Parties (Post Lower Chamber Judgment)
48(2)
Hearing by the Grand Chamber via Relinquishment by the Lower Chamber of Its Jurisdiction Prior to the Chamber Issuing Its Final Judgment in the Case
49(1)
When the Lower Chambers Judgment Becomes Final
49(1)
Re-hearing by the Grand Chamber and Just Satisfaction
50(1)
Key Steps in Case Processing in the European Court of Human Rights System
50(2)
Public Proceedings and Judgments and Reasons for Judgment
52(3)
Representation
52(1)
Expedited Cases
52(1)
The Language of the Court
53(1)
Compensation for Damages
53(1)
Judgments and Their Implications
53(1)
Advisory Opinions by the Grand Chamber
53(1)
Caseload, and Breakdown of the Nature and Origin of Cases Heard by the Court
54(1)
The International Ad Hoc Criminal Courts of Rwanda and the Territory of the Former Yugoslavia
55(14)
International Criminal Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Genocide and Other Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Rwanda and Rwandan Citizens Responsible for Genocide and Other Such Violations Committed in the Territory of Neighboring States Between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 1994 (ICTR)
55(6)
History and Jurisdiction of the ICTR
55(3)
Structure of the ICTR
58(2)
Summary
60(1)
The International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Former Yugoslavia since 1991
61(8)
History of the Conflict in the Former Yugoslavia
61(2)
Jurisdiction of the ICTY
63(2)
Structure and Functioning of the ICTY
65(2)
Summary
67(2)
The Special Court of Sierra Leone
69(10)
The Civil War in Sierra Leone (1991-2002)
69(1)
Jurisdiction of the Special Court of Sierra Leone
70(4)
Creation of the SCSL and Subject Matter Jurisdiction
70(1)
SCSL Lack of Jurisdiction Over Peacekeepers and NGO Personnel
70(1)
Temporal Limitation on the SCSL Jurisdiction
71(1)
Detailed Description of the Crimes Under the Jurisdiction of the SCSL
71(2)
Amnesty
73(1)
Minors as Defendants
73(1)
Concurrent Jurisdiction
74(1)
Structure of the Special Court of Sierra Leone
74(2)
The Chambers
75(1)
Office of the Prosecutor
75(1)
Office of the Defence
76(1)
The Registry
76(1)
Judgments and Penalties
76(1)
Concluding Comments
77(2)
The International Criminal Court
79(18)
Individual Criminal Liability and ICC Jurisdiction
84(2)
The Principle of ``Complementarity''
86(1)
Structure of the ICC
87(1)
The Presidency
87(1)
The Divisions of the Court
87(1)
Other Independent Organs of the Court
88(1)
Victims as ``Participants'' Vs. ``Witnesses'' During ICC Proceedings
88(2)
The Pre-trial Chamber Preliminary Decision on Admissibility Based on Prima Facie Evidence Presented by the Office of the Prosecutor
90(1)
Procedure Where the Office of the Prosecutor Decides Not to Investigate
91(1)
Inadmissibility Criteria
91(1)
The Pre-trial Hearing to Confirm or Reject the Charges
92(1)
Appeals of Pre-trial Judgments
92(1)
The Trial Division
93(1)
The Appeal Division
93(1)
ICC Judgments
94(1)
Concluding Comments
94(3)
Part II: The International Human Rights Courts
Inter-American Court of Human Rights
97(72)
Case of the Gomez-Paquiyauri Brothers v. Peru
97(1)
Excerpt from the Judgment of July 8, 2004: (Merits, Reparations and Costs)
97(15)
Notes and Questions
112(11)
Who Were the Child Victims (Persons Under Age 18 Years) in the Gomez-Paquiyauri Brothers v. Peru Case?
112(1)
Did International Justice in This Case Affirm Respect for the Human Rights of the Child?
113(1)
What Was the Nature of the Reparations Ordered by the Court (IAC), to Whom Were They to Be Paid, and Is There Any Potential Significance of Certain of the Reparations in Terms of Promoting the Rights of the Child?
114(2)
Was the International Obligation to Afford Children Special Protection Acknowledged, and the Nature of the Offence Considered ``Aggravated'' by the Fact that the Victims Were Children?
116(1)
Was There Any Public Acknowledgement of the Violation of International Human Rights Law in Gomez-Paquiyauri Brothers v. Peru?
117(1)
Were the Principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) Reflected in the Treatment of the Case and the Remedy Afforded the Victims?
118(1)
Did the Alleged Primacy of the National Court in the Instant Case Hinder or Facilitate the State's International Accountability for the International Crimes Committed Within Its Jurisdiction?
118(2)
Would Justice Have Been Better Served by Advancing the Gomez-Paquiyauri Brothers v. Peru Case Before an Alternative International System (in This Case the ICC) Had That Been Possible?
120(1)
Were the Victims and Their Family in Gomez-Paquiyauri Brothers v. Peru Accorded Justice Under International Law?
121(2)
Case of the Yean and Bosico Children v. Dominican Republic
123(1)
Excerpt from the Judgment of September 8, 2005
123(20)
Notes and Questions
143(26)
Who Were the Child Victims in the Case of the Yean and Boscio Children v. Dominican Republic?
143(2)
Did International Justice in This Case Affirm Respect for the Human Rights of the Child?
145(6)
Was the Full Scope of the State Violations of International Human Rights Law Set Out by the Inter-American Court in Yean and Bosico Children v. The Dominican Republic?
151(5)
Was There an Acknowledgement by the Court of Offences Under International Law Committed by the State?
156(3)
What Was the Nature of the Reparations Ordered by the Court, to Whom Were They to Be Paid and Is There Any Special Significance of the Reparations that Ought to Be Recognized in Terms of Promoting the Rights of the Child?
159(1)
Was the International Obligation to Afford Children Special Protection Acknowledged by the Inter-American Court and the Nature of the Offence Considered Aggravated by the Fact that the Victims Were Children?
159(1)
Was There Any Requirement for a Public Acknowledgement of the State's Violations of Its International Human Rights Obligations to the Child Victims in Yean and Bosico Children v. The Dominican Republic?
160(1)
Were the Principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child Reflected in the Treatment of the Case and the Remedy Afforded the Victims?
161(1)
Did the Alleged Primacy of the National Court in the Instant Case Hinder or Facilitate the State's International Accountability for the Violations of International Human Rights Law Committed Within Its Jurisdiction?
161(2)
Would Justice Have Been Better Served by Advancing the Case Before an Alternative International System (in this case the ICC) Had That Been Possible?
163(1)
Can Undue Delay in the Possibility to Seek a Domestic Remedy Facilitate Access to an International Human Rights Court?
164(1)
Were the Yean and Bosico Children and Their Parents and Other Children of Dominican-Haitian Ancestry Born in and Residing in the Dominican Republic and Denied Their Nationality Accorded Justice Under International Law as a Consequence of This Case?
165(4)
European Court of Human Rights
169(114)
Case of Isayeva, Yusupova and Bazayeva v. Russia
169(1)
Excerpt from the Judgment of February 24, 2005 (Final: 06/07/2005)
169(44)
Notes and Questions
213(15)
Who Were the Child Victims in the Case of Isayeva, Yusupova and Bazayeva vs. Russia?
213(1)
Did International Justice in This Case Affirm Respect for the Separable Independent Human Rights of the Child?
213(3)
Was There a Public Acknowledgement Through the ECHR Judgment Itself of the Offences Under International Human Rights Law Committed by the State Through Its Agents?
216(1)
What Was the Nature of the Reparations Ordered by the Court, to Whom Were They to Be Paid, and Is There Any Special Significance of the Reparations in Terms of Promoting the Rights of the Child?
216(1)
Was the International Obligation to Afford Children ``Special Protection'' Acknowledged and the Nature of the Offence Considered ``Aggravated'' by the Fact that the Victims Were Children?
217(1)
Was There Any Public Acknowledgement by the State of the Violation of International Human Rights and/or Humanitarian Law Committed Against the Child Victims in the Instant Case?
218(5)
Were the Principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) Reflected in the Treatment of the Case and the Remedy Afforded the Victims?
223(2)
Did the Primacy Accorded Domestic Courts Hinder or Facilitate the State's International Accountability in the Instant Case for the International Human Rights Violations Committed Within Its Jurisdiction?
225(1)
Would Justice Have Been Better Served by Advancing the Case Before an Alternative International System (in This Case the ICC) Had That Been Possible?
225(1)
What Remedy Were the Victims in the Instant Case Most Interested in Securing and Was the ECHR Judgment Helpful or Unhelpful in Their Moving Closer to Attaining That Remedy?
226(2)
Case of Aydin v. Turkey (57/1996/676/866)
228(1)
Excerpt from the Judgment of September 25, 1997
228(33)
Notes and Questions
261(22)
Who Was the Child Victim in Aydin v. Turkey?
261(1)
Did International Justice in This Case Affirm Respect for the Human Rights of the Child?
262(2)
Were the Medical Examinations Conducted of the Child Victim Directed Toward Establishing Whether or Not She Had Been Raped?
264(1)
Was the Full Scope of the State Violations of International Law Set Out by the Court Including Any International Crimes that May Have Been Committed?
265(1)
Was There Any Public Acknowledgement of the Grievous International Human Rights Abuses Committed Against Sukran as a Child Victim?
266(1)
Were the Principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child Reflected in the Treatment of the Aydin Case and the Remedy Afforded the Victims?
266(1)
Would Justice Have Been Better Served by Advancing the Aydin Case Before an Alternative International System (in This Case the ICC) Had That Been Possible?
267(1)
Were the Victim and Her Family in Aydin Accorded the Full Measure of Justice Under International Human Rights Law by the European Court of Human Rights?
267(1)
What Was the Nature of the Reparations Ordered by the Court, to Whom Were They to Be Paid and Is There Any Special Significance of the Reparations that Ought to Be Recognized in Terms of Promoting the Rights of the Child?
268(1)
Did the ECHR Err in Failing to Find a Violation of Article 25 of the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms?
269(1)
Does UN Security Council Resolution 1820 Categorize Rape and Other Sexual Violence Occurring in Some Contexts as an International Crime?
270(1)
Does UN Security Council Resolution 1820 Concern Sexual Violence of Various Forms Against Both Civilians and Non-Civilian Victims?
271(1)
Does UN Security Council Resolution 1820 Acknowledge that UN Peacekeepers Have Sometimes Been Perpetrators of Sexual Violence Against the Very Population They Were Meant to Protect?
271(1)
Is There a Continuing Need for the UN Security Council Resolution 1820?
271(1)
What Is the Text of the UN Security Council Resolution 1820 Concerning the Use of Rape and Other Forms of Sexual Violence in Situations of Armed Conflict or Post-conflict?
272(4)
How Has the International Community Addressed the Issue of Peace Keepers and Humanitarian Aid Workers Who Sexually Offend Against Children They Were Sent to Protect and Serve?
276(3)
What Is the Contribution of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Trust Fund for Victims to Assisting the Victims of International Crimes Involving Sexual Violence?
279(4)
Part III: The International Ad Hoc Criminal Courts
International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
283(38)
The Prosecutor v. Sylvester Gacumbitsi (Case No. ICTR-2001-64-A)
283(1)
Excerpt from the Appeal Judgment 7 July, 2006
283(33)
Notes and Questions
316(5)
Who Were the Child Victims in Prosecutor v. Sylvestre Gacumbitsi?
316(1)
Did International Justice in This Case Affirm Respect for the Human Rights of the Child?
316(1)
Was There Any Public Acknowledgement of the International Crimes Committed Against Child Victims in the Gacumbitsi case?
317(1)
Were the Principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child Reflected in the Treatment of the Case by the International Criminal Court of Rwanda and in the Remedy Afforded the Victims?
318(1)
Was There Reliance on National Sentencing Provisions, and if So, Did This Hinder or Facilitate the International Accountability of the State and Its Agents for the International Crimes?
318(2)
What Type of International Criminal Court Is the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda?
320(1)
International Tribunal for the Prosecution of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed in the Territory of Former Yugoslavia Since 1991
321(32)
Prosecutor v. Miroslav Bralo (Case No. IT-95-17-S)
321(1)
Excerpt from the Judgment of 7 December, 2005
321(22)
Notes and Questions
343(10)
Who Were the Child Victims in Prosecutor v. Miroslav Bralo?
343(1)
Did International Justice in This Case Affirm Respect for the Human Rights of the Child?
344(1)
Was There Any Public Acknowledgement of the International Crimes Committed Against Child Victims in Prosecutor v. Miroslav Bralo Aside from the Judgment Itself?
345(2)
Were the Principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child Reflected in the Treatment of the Case and the Remedy Afforded the Victims?
347(1)
Did Reliance on National Sentencing Provisions with Respect to the Possibility of Early Release in the Instant Case Hinder or Facilitate the International Accountability of the State and Its Agents for the International Crimes?
348(1)
What Type of International Criminal Court Is the ICTY?
348(5)
Part IV: The International Hybrid Criminal Courts
The Special Court for Sierra Leona
353(92)
Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofana and Allieu Kondewa
353(1)
Excerpt from the Judgment in the Appeals Chamber of 28 May, 2008
353(61)
Notes and Questions
414(31)
Who Were the Child Victims in the Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofaza and Allieu Kondewa Case?
414(1)
Did International Justice in Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofana and Allieu Kondewa Affirm Respect for the Fundamental Human Rights of the Child?
415(3)
Does the Recruitment and Use of Children Under Age 15 Years for Active Participation in Armed Conflict Rise to the Level of ``a Crime Against Humanity''?
418(2)
What Was the Outcome Regarding the Charges Against Fofana of Recruiting and Using Children Under Age 15 for Active Participation in Armed Hostilities?
420(2)
What Was the Outcome Regarding the Charges Against Kondewa of Recruiting and Using Children Under Age 15 for Active Participation in Armed Hostilities?
422(7)
How Was the Issue of CDF Sexual Violence Against Girls Handled by the Special Court of Sierra Leone in The Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofana and Allieu Kondewa?
429(3)
Should the Alleged Acts of Sexual Violence Against Children Committed by the CDF Have Been Dealt with Under Article 5(a) of the Statute of the Special Court of Sierra Leone Which Deals with Crimes of Violence (Including Sexual Violence) Against Girl Children Under Sierra Leonean Law?
432(1)
Were the Child Victims Regarded as Having Juridical Personality in Their Own Right and the Right to ``Special Protection'' as Children Under International Law, or Were the Child Victims' Rights Subsumed in Some Way Under the Rights of the Adult Victims?
432(1)
Was There an Acknowledgement of All the Offences Under International Law Committed by the Defendants?
433(1)
Were the Sentences Meted Out to the Defendants in the CDF Case, The Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofana and Allieu Kondewa, Adequate in Promoting the Rights of the Child?
434(1)
Was the International Obligation to Afford Children Special Protection Acknowledged and the Nature of the Offence Considered Aggravated by the Fact that the Victims Were Children?
435(1)
Did the Appeal Judgment in Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofaza and Allieu Kondewa Itself Serve as Adequate Public Acknowledgement of the International Crimes Committed Against Child Victims by the CDF?
436(1)
Were the Principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child Reflected in the Treatment of the Case and the Remedy Afforded the Victims?
436(1)
Did the Primacy of the Hybrid International Special Court of Sierra Leone Facilitate International Accountability for the International Crimes Committed Within the State?
437(1)
What Were the Special Court of Sierra Leone's Conclusions Regarding the Issue of ``Systemic Attacks Against Civilians'' by the CDF Forces as an Element to Be Proved Respecting Certain of the Specific International Crimes Charged in the Case?
438(1)
Was There Any Reliance by the Special Court of Sierra Leone in the Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofaza and Allieu Kondewa on alleged Mitigating Factors Which Should Have Been Regarded as Merely Irrelevant Culture-Specific Rationales for the Commission of International Crimes by the CDF?
439(2)
Would Justice Have Been Better Served by Advancing the CDF Case Before the International Criminal Court Had This Been Possible Rather than Before the Hybrid Special Court of Sierra Leone?
441(2)
Were the Victims and Their Families Accorded Justice Under International Law by the Special Court of Sierra Leone in The Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofaza and Allieu Kondewa?
443(1)
What Was the Impact, If Any, of the Decision in The Prosecutor v. Moinina Fofaza and Allieu Kondewa on the Possibility for Rehabilitation and Re-integration of Ex CDF Child Soldiers?
443(2)
The Special Court for Sierra Leona
445(678)
Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu
445(1)
Excerpt from the Judgment in the Appeals Chamber of February 22, 2008
445(22)
Notes and Questions
467(10)
What Were the Charges and Who Were the Victims in The Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kamu?
467(1)
Did International Justice in The Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu Affirm Respect for the Fundamental Human Rights of the Child?
468(1)
Did the Appeal Court in the AFRC Case Consider the Vulnerability of Child Victims as an Aggravating Factor with Regard to Forced Marriage; a Crime Against Humanity?
469(1)
What Was the Position of the Appeal Court in the AFRC Case Regarding ``Arranged Marriages'' Vs. ``Forced Marriages'' and What Are the Implications for the Advancement of Children's Fundamental Human Rights (i.e., Such as Liberty Rights and the Right to Security of the Person)?
470(2)
Were the Principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child Reflected in the Treatment of the Case and the Remedy Afforded the Victims?
472(1)
What Was the Outcome Regarding the Charges in the AFRC Case Regarding Recruiting and Using Children Under Age 15 for Active Participation in Armed Hostilities and with Respect to Sexual Slavery?
472(1)
Were the Sentences Meted Out to the Defendants in the AFRC Case by the Appeal Court Adequate in Promoting Respect for the Rights of the Child in the International Community?
473(4)
Part V: The International Criminal Court (The Hague)
The Prosecutor v. Thomas Lubanga Dyilo (Democratic Republic of the Congo)
477(1)
Submission of the Prosecution's Updated Summary of Presentation of Evidence (ICC-01/04-01/06-1363)
477(32)
Amicus Brief: ``Written Submissions of the United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Children and Armed Conflict'' (ICC-01/04-01/06-1229-AnxA)
509(7)
Redacted Version of ``Decision on the Prosecution's Application to Lift the Stay of Proceedings'' (ICC-01/04-01/06-1467)
516(13)
Decision on the Consequences of Non-disclosure of Exculpatory Materials Covered by Article 54(3)(e) Agreements and the Application to Stay the Prosecution of the Accused, Together with Certain Other Issues Raised at the Status Conference on 10 June, 2008
529(24)
Notes and Questions
553(44)
Notes and Questions Regarding the Prosecutor's Updated Submission of Evidence of 30 May, 2008 (ICC-01/04-01/06-1363)
553(10)
Notes and Questions on the ``Decision on the Prosecution's Application to Lift the Stay of Proceedings'' (ICC-01/04-01/06-1467)
563(15)
Notes and Questions Regarding the Amicus Brief ``Written Submissions of the United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Children and Armed Conflict'' of 17 March, 2008 (ICC-01/04-01/06-1229-AnxA)
578(19)
Part VI: Documents
American Convention on Human Rights
597(26)
American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man
623(10)
Statute of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights
633(10)
Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights in the Area of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, ``Protocol of San Salvador''
643(10)
Additional Protocol to the American Convention on Human Rights to Abolish the Death Penalty
653(2)
Inter-American Convention to Prevent and Punish Torture
655(8)
Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence Against Women ``Convention of Belem do Para''
663(8)
Inter-American Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Persons with Disabilities
671(8)
Inter-American Convention on Forced Disappearance of Persons
679(8)
Inter-American Convention on Conflict of Laws Concerning the Adoption of Minors
687(8)
Statute of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights
695(10)
Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms
705(32)
European Convention on Recognition and Enforcement of Decisions Concerning Custody of Children and on Restoration of Custody of Children
737(12)
European Convention on the Adoption of Children
749(10)
European Convention on the Exercise of Children's Rights
759(10)
European Convention on the Legal Status of Children Born out of Wedlock
769(6)
European Convention on Nationality
775(14)
Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
789(14)
Updated Statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia
803(56)
Statute of the Special Court for Sierra Leone
859(10)
Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court
869(78)
Elements of Crimes
947(48)
African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child
995(18)
Cape Town Principles and Best Practice on the Prevention of Recruitment of Children into the Armed Forces and Demobilization and Social Integration of Child Soldiers in Africa
1013(8)
Convention on the Rights of the Child
1021(22)
Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict
1043(6)
The Paris Principles
1049(50)
The Paris Commitments to Protect Children from Unlawful Recruitment or Use by Armed Forces or Armed Groups
1099(4)
United Nations Resolution 1820 (2008): S/RES/1820 (2008)
1103(6)
Brussels Principles Against Impunity and for International Justice
1109(14)
About the Author 1123(2)
Index 1125
Sonja C. Grover, Ph.D., is a Professor with Lakehead University, Canada. She has authored 7 books and over 80 refereed articles; over 60 on the topic of human rights published in leading international human rights and law journals, has presented numerous international conference papers and published book chapters in this field. She has also written several books on children's human rights including, "Children's Human Rights: Challenging Global Barriers to the Child Liberation Movement" (2007); "The Child's Right to Legal Standing" (2008) and a major reference book, "Prosecuting International Crimes and Human Rights Abuses Committed Against Children: Leading International Court Cases" (2009).