Understanding Nanomedicine: An Introductory Textbook [Hardback]

(Medical Nanotechnologies Incorporated, Richardson, Texas, USA)
  • Formāts: Hardback, 524 pages, height x width x depth: 229x152x30 mm, weight: 975 g, 92 black & white illustrations, 228 colour illustrations
  • Sērija : Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Crop Plants
  • Izdošanas datums: 18-Jun-2012
  • Izdevniecība: Pan Stanford Publishing Pte Ltd
  • ISBN-10: 9814316385
  • ISBN-13: 9789814316385
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  • Bibliotēkām
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  • Formāts: Hardback, 524 pages, height x width x depth: 229x152x30 mm, weight: 975 g, 92 black & white illustrations, 228 colour illustrations
  • Sērija : Genetics, Genomics and Breeding of Crop Plants
  • Izdošanas datums: 18-Jun-2012
  • Izdevniecība: Pan Stanford Publishing Pte Ltd
  • ISBN-10: 9814316385
  • ISBN-13: 9789814316385
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
A nanoscientist with a background in biochemistry and molecular biology, Burgess provides a textbook for a course introducing the principles of nanotechnology and its applications in medicine. His topics include nanoparticles and hyperthermic cancer therapeutics, nanofiber-base scaffolds and tissue engineering, nanotechnology and surgery, nanoparticle-based drug delivery, and government influences on nanotechnology. Distributed in North America by CRC Press. Annotation ©2012 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

This book comprehensively covers a broad range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications of nanotechnology, providing descriptions of cutting-edge discoveries along with historical perspectives. The text focuses on nanomaterials and nanoparticles, the sectors that hold the most promise for the future of medicine. The author look at how nanotechnology can impact cancer treatment, clinical neuroscience, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and diagnostics. He also discusses the worldwide governmental regulatory impact on nanomedicine.

Recenzijas

"This book is a comprehensive effort to introduce the diverse field of nanomedicine to students. I know of nothing else like it on the market." -Prof. Rockford K. Draper - University of Texas at Dallas, USA "In a single book, Dr. Burgess has done an excellent job in providing the much-needed background in the numerous physical, chemical, and biological methods that are used to enable nanomedicine. This book will be a useful reference for any student in the field of nanomedicine and describes many examples where nanotechnology promises to improve the diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment of disease" -Dr. Gareth Hughes - Medical Nanotechnologies, Inc., USA

Acknowledgment xix
Preface to the Professor xxi
Preface to the Student xxvii
Reviewers xxix
1 Fundamentals of Nanotechnology
1(44)
Nanotechnology and Its Origins
1(4)
The Basics of the Nanoscale
5(2)
Nanomaterials and Nanoparticles
7(20)
Fullerenes
7(5)
Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNT)
12(2)
Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNT)
14(1)
Thermal Properties of Carbon Nanotubes
15(1)
Absorptive Properties of Carbon Nanotubes
16(2)
Perfluorocarbons
18(1)
Inorganic Nanoparticles
18(1)
Types of Biocompatible Inorganic Metal Nanoparticles
19(1)
Gold Nanoshells
19(2)
Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles
21(1)
Silver Nanoparticles
22(1)
Other Types of Biocompatible Nanoparticles
23(1)
Dendrimers
23(1)
Micelles and Liposomes
24(3)
Nanotools
27(5)
Scanning Tunneling Microscope
27(2)
Atomic Force Microscope
29(1)
Commercial Nanotools: The nProber™
30(2)
Current Manufacturing Research
32(4)
Top-Down Approach
33(1)
Bottom-Up Approach
33(2)
Atomically Precise Manufacturing
35(1)
Bionanotechnology
36(5)
Nucleic Acid Nanotechnology
36(2)
Nanotechnology's Potential Impact on Medicine
38(3)
Chapter Summary
41(2)
Nanotechnology and Its Origins
41(1)
The Basics of the Nanoscale
41(1)
Nanomaterials and Nanoparticles
41(1)
Nanotools
42(1)
Current Manufacturing Research
42(1)
Bionanotechnology
42(1)
Key Terms
43(1)
Review Questions
44(1)
2 Nanoparticles and Hyperthermic Cancer Therapeutics
45(32)
Nanoparticles and Thermal Ablation
45(9)
Mechanisms of Action
45(1)
Metals and Light
46(1)
Metals and Radiofrequency Waves
46(1)
Carbon Nanotubes and Radiofrequency Waves
47(2)
Carbon Nanotubes and Light
49(1)
Carbon Nanotubes, Heat and Cancer Therapeutics
50(1)
Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles, Magnetism and Mechanism of Action
51(2)
Treatable Types of Cancer
53(1)
Non-specific, Localized Use of Nanoparticles for Tumor Ablation
54(1)
Targeting Nanoparticles to Specific Sites for Tumor Ablation
54(17)
Targeting Agents
56(1)
Monoclonal Antibodies
56(3)
Small Molecules
59(4)
Aptamers
63(2)
Peptides
65(1)
Targeting Moiety Attachment
66(1)
Covalent Attachment
66(2)
Non-covalent Attachment
68(3)
In vivo Anticancer Platform Delivery
71(2)
Localized Injection
71(1)
Intravenous Injection
71(2)
Chapter Summary
73(1)
Nanoparticles and Thermal Ablation
73(1)
Non-specific, Localized Use of Nanoparticles for Tumor Ablation
73(1)
Targeting Nanoparticles to Specific Sites for Tumor Ablation
73(1)
In vivo Anticancer Platform Delivery
74(1)
Key Terms
74(1)
Review Questions
75(2)
3 Nanofiber-Based Scaffolds and Tissue Engineering
77(40)
Composition and Types of Nanofibers
78(15)
Natural Polymeric Nanofibers
79(1)
Collagen
79(2)
Chitosan
81(1)
Hyaluronic Acid (HA)
81(1)
Gelatin
82(1)
Silk Fibroin
83(1)
Human Protein
84(3)
Synthetic Polymeric Nanofibers
87(2)
Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)
89(2)
Synthetic Non-polymeric Nanofibers
91(1)
Carbon Nanofibers
91(2)
Techniques for the Synthesis of Nanofibers
93(7)
Electrospinning
93(2)
Self-Assembly
95(3)
Phase Separation
98(2)
Nanofiber Applications in Tissue Engineering
100(10)
Bone, Cartilage and Ligaments
100(5)
Skin
105(1)
Vasculature
106(4)
Nanofiber Applications in Controlled Drug Delivery
110(3)
Chapter Summary
113(2)
Composition and Types of Nanofibers
113(1)
Techniques for the Synthesis of Nanofibers
114(1)
Nanofiber Applications in Tissue Engineering
114(1)
Nanofiber Applications in Controlled Drug Delivery
114(1)
Key Terms
115(1)
Review Questions
115(2)
4 Nanotechnology and Neuroscience
117(38)
Nanomaterial Scaffolds and Neuroregeneration
118(7)
Carbon Nanotube-Based Neuronal Matrices
121(4)
Neuronal Nanotube Matrices from Other Materials
125(1)
Nanomaterials for Crossing the Blood/Brain Barrier
125(18)
Micelles
128(2)
Liposomes
130(1)
Dendrimers
131(5)
Nanoparticles
136(3)
Nanogels
139(4)
Nanomaterials and Neuroprotection
143(4)
Nanoparticle-Based Oxides (Anti-Oxidants)
143(1)
Fullerenes
144(3)
Cells as Nanomaterial Carriers for Clinical Neuroscience
147(3)
Chapter Summary
150(2)
Nanomaterial Scaffolds and Neuroregeneration
150(1)
Nanomaterials for Crossing the Blood/Brain Barrier
150(2)
Nanomaterials and Neuroprotection
152(1)
Cells as Nanomaterial Carriers for Clinical Neuroscience
152(1)
Key Terms
152(1)
Review Questions
153(2)
5 Nanotechnology and Surgery
155(42)
Implant and Surgical Instrument Design
156(13)
Nanocoatings for Implants
156(1)
Nanomaterial Adsorption and Adhesion
156(3)
Nanostructured Diamond Coatings
159(4)
Nanostructured Hydroxyapatite Coatings
163(3)
Nanostructured Metalloceramic Coatings
166(2)
Nanopolymer Scaffolds
168(1)
Minimizing Surgical Damage
169(3)
Nanopulses
169(2)
Nanocoatings for Surgical Instruments
171(1)
Post-surgical and Other Wound Healing
172(9)
Point of Entry Repair
172(1)
Laser-Assisted Nanosutures
173(1)
Nanofiber-Based Bandages
173(3)
Antisepsis
176(1)
Antibiotic Nanocoatings
177(2)
Nanosilver
179(2)
Intracellular Nanosurgery
181(11)
Laser-Based Nanosurgery
182(8)
Non-Laser-Based Intracellular Nanosurgery
190(2)
Chapter Summary
192(3)
Implant and Surgical Instrument Design
192(1)
Minimizing Surgical Damage
193(1)
Post-surgical and Other Wound Healing
193(1)
Intracellular Nanosurgery
194(1)
Key Terms
195(1)
Review Questions
196(1)
6 Nanomatrices for Cell Culture
197(36)
A Brief History of Tissue (Cell) Culture
198(2)
Types of Cells Cultured
200(1)
Manipulation of Cultured Cells
200(2)
2D or Not 2D?
202(1)
3D Cell Culture and the Issues of Scale and Purity
203(2)
Synthetic Nanofiber Scaffolds
205(4)
Polymer-Based
205(1)
Ultra-Web®
205(2)
PLLA-Based
207(1)
Carbon Nanofiber-Based
208(1)
Natural Nanofiber Scaffolds
209(10)
Collagen-Based
210(2)
Silk Fibroin-Based
212(1)
Chitosan-Based
213(1)
Biocomposites
213(2)
Three-Dimensional Self-Assembling Peptides
215(4)
Cellularizing Nanofiber Scaffolds
219(5)
Optimizing Nanoscaffold Architecture for Cellularization
219(2)
Cell Seeding within the Nanomatrix
221(3)
Other Nanotechnology-Based Cell Culture Systems
224(4)
Titanium-Based Systems
224(2)
Magnetic Nanoparticle-Based Systems
226(2)
Chapter Summary
228(3)
A Brief History of Tissue (Cell) Culture
228(1)
Types of Cells Cultured
229(1)
Manipulation of Cultured Cells
229(1)
2D or Not 2D?
229(1)
3D Cell Culture and the Issues of Scale and Purity
229(1)
Synthetic Nanofiber Scaffolds
230(1)
Natural Nanofiber Scaffolds
230(1)
Cellularizing Nanofiber Scaffolds
230(1)
Other Nanotechnology-Based Cell Culture Systems
231(1)
Key Terms
231(1)
Review Questions
232(1)
7 Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery
233(48)
Targeted Drug Delivery: Basic Principles
234(4)
Active Targeted Drug Delivery
235(2)
Passive Targeted Drug Delivery
237(1)
Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Basic Requirements
238(2)
Types of Nanoparticle-Based Systems for Drug Delivery
240(36)
Synthetic Polymer-Based Nanoparticles
240(1)
Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)
240(2)
Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic) Acid (PLGA)
242(3)
Polylactic Acid (PLA)
245(2)
Polycaprolactone (PCL)
247(2)
Polyacrylate (PACA)
249(3)
Dendrimers
252(5)
Synthetic Metal-Based Nanoparticles
257(1)
Iron Oxide
257(2)
Fullerenes
259(1)
Buckyballs (C60)
259(1)
Buckysomes
260(3)
Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs)
263(4)
Natural Material-Based Nanoparticles
267(1)
Liposomes
267(1)
Liposomal Nanoparticles and Targeting Inflammation
267(2)
Chitosan
269(3)
Gelatin
272(3)
Albumin
275(1)
Chapter Summary
276(3)
Targeted Drug Delivery: Basic Principles
276(1)
Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Basic Requirements
277(1)
Types of Nanoparticle-Based Systems for Drug Delivery
277(2)
Key Terms
279(1)
Review Questions
279(2)
8 Nanodiagnostics
281(46)
In vitro Nanodiagnostics
282(22)
Nanobiochips and Nanobiosensors
282(13)
Cantilever Biosensors
295(1)
Nanolaser Scanning Confocal Spectroscopy
296(3)
Mass Spectroscopy and Nanoproteomics
299(1)
Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanobiosensors
300(4)
In vivo Nanodiagnostics
304(16)
Gold Nanoparticles
304(2)
"Golden" Carbon Nanotubes
306(1)
Magnetic Nanoparticles
307(3)
Perfluorocarbons
310(2)
Quantum Dots
312(3)
Liposomes and Micelles as Diagnostic Metal Nanoparticle Carriers
315(5)
Chapter Summary
320(4)
Nanodiagnostics Technologies and Applications
320(2)
In vivo Nanodiagnostics
322(2)
Key Terms
324(1)
Review Questions
324(3)
9 Government Influence on Nanotechnology
327(62)
Government Promotion of Advancements in Nanomedicine
328(27)
U.S. Government Funding and Initiatives
328(1)
U.S. Federal Funding for Nanomedicine
328(1)
U.S. Presidential Influence
328(1)
The Federal Government's National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI)
329(1)
The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH)
330(4)
The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
334(2)
The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)
336(1)
The U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer
337(1)
U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
338(1)
U.S. State Funding and Initiatives
339(1)
Missouri
339(1)
New York
340(1)
Texas
341(2)
Australian Government Funding and Initiatives
343(1)
Victorian Government
344(1)
Canadian Government Funding and Initiatives
345(2)
European Funding and Initiatives
347(1)
Nano2Life
347(2)
European Technology Platform (ETP) in Nanomedicine
349(2)
Singaporean Government Funding and Initiatives
351(1)
Mexican Government Funding and Initiatives
352(1)
Global Institutional Collaborations
352(1)
Global Enterprise for Micro-Mechanics and Molecular Medicine (GEM4)
353(2)
Government Evaluation, Policy and Regulation of Nanotechnology
355(1)
The United States Federal Oversight
356(7)
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration Nanotechnology Task Force
356(3)
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
359(1)
The U.S. National Science and Technology Council (NSTC)
360(1)
The U.S. National Research Council
361(1)
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
362(1)
The Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies
363(1)
State and Local Oversight
363(2)
California State Regulation of Carbon Nanotubes
363(1)
Berkeley, California and the Regulation of Nanoparticles
364(1)
The European Union
365(1)
The United Kingdom
366(6)
The Royal Society's Analysis on the Safety of Nanoparticles
367(1)
The Council for Science and Technology (CST)
368(1)
Nanotechnology Engagement Group (NEG)
368(1)
The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
369(1)
British House of Lords
370(1)
The Government of the United Kingdom
371(1)
Australia
372(1)
Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
372(1)
Monash University and Its Influence on Australia's Regulatory Framework
373(1)
Canada
373(2)
Environment Canada
374(1)
Health Canada
374(1)
International Efforts at Nanotechnology Regulation
375(6)
The International Risk Governance Council (IRGC)
375(1)
The International Council on Nanotechnology (ICON)
376(1)
The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)
377(1)
The International Center for Technology Assessment (ICTA)
378(1)
The International Union of Food, Farm and Hotel Workers (IUF)
379(1)
US/EU Collaborative Efforts
380(1)
Chapter Summary
381(5)
Government Promotion of Advancements in Nanomedicine
381(2)
Government Evaluation, Policy and Regulation of Nanotechnology
383(3)
Key Terms
386(1)
Review Questions
387(2)
10 Future Concepts in Nanomedicine
389(38)
Nanorobotics and Medicine
389(21)
Nanomolecular Motors and Gears
390(1)
Rotaxane-Based Nanomotors
391(2)
Nucleic Acid-Based Nanomotors
393(1)
Nanotube-Based Nanomotors
394(2)
Nanogears
396(1)
Nanocomputers
396(1)
Electronic Nanocomputers
397(1)
Mechanical Nanocomputers
398(3)
Chemical and Biological Nanocomputers
401(1)
Quantum Nanocomputers
402(2)
Therapeutic Nanorobots
404(1)
Respirocytes
405(1)
Clottocytes
406(1)
Microbivores
407(2)
Chromallocytes
409(1)
Personalized Nanomedicine
410(4)
Nanoparticle-Based Theranostics
410(1)
Whole-Genome Diagnostics
411(3)
Nanonephrology
414(1)
Nanoneural Interfaces
415(2)
Optical Imaging at the Nanoscale
417(3)
Artificial Intelligence and "the Singularity"
420(2)
Chapter Summary
422(3)
Nanorobotics and Medicine
422(2)
Personalized Nanomedicine
424(1)
Key Terms
425(1)
Review Questions
425(2)
Appendixes
427(52)
Glossary
427(33)
Suggested Readings
460(19)
Books and Compilations
460(19)
Figure and Table Acknowledgments 479(2)
Index 481(12)
About the Author 493
Rob Burgess is a scientist, entrepreneur, businessman, and author who switched scientific disciplines in 2006 at the age of 38 to take a chance on nanotechnology. It changed his life forever. He has held numerous academic and industry-related positions, including research fellow at the University of California, San Diego; founding scientist at Lexicon Genetics Incorporated; founder and president at Genome Biosciences Incorporated; vice president, research and development, at Zyvex Corporation; and vice president, business development, at Stem Cell Sciences, LLC. He is currently founder, chairman, and president at Medical Nanotechnologies Incorporated and an adjunct professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Texas, Dallas. He holds a bachelor of arts in biochemistry from the University of Texas, Austin, and a Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston.