Early Modern Histories of Time: The Periodizations of Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century England [Hardback]

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  • Formāts: Hardback, 376 pages, height x width: 229x152 mm
  • Izdošanas datums: 25-Oct-2019
  • Izdevniecība: University of Pennsylvania Press
  • ISBN-10: 0812251520
  • ISBN-13: 9780812251524
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
  • Formāts: Hardback, 376 pages, height x width: 229x152 mm
  • Izdošanas datums: 25-Oct-2019
  • Izdevniecība: University of Pennsylvania Press
  • ISBN-10: 0812251520
  • ISBN-13: 9780812251524
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:

Early Modern Histories of Time examines how chronological modes intrinsic to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries shaped the thought-worlds of those living during this time and the ways in which these temporally indigenous models can productively influence our own working concepts of historical period.



Early Modern Histories of Time examines how a range of chronological modes intrinsic to the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries shaped the thought-worlds of those living during this time and explores how these temporally indigenous models can productively influence our own working concepts of historical period. This innovative approach thus moves beyond debates about where we should divide linear time (and what to call the ensuing segments) to reconsider the very concept of "period." Bringing together an eminent cast of literary scholars and historians, the volume develops productive historical models by drawing on the very texts and cultural contexts that are their objects of study. What happens to the idea of "period" when English literature is properly placed within the dynamic currents of pan-European literary phenomena? How might we think of historical period through the palimpsested nature of buildings, through the religious concept of the secular, through the demographic model of the life cycle, even through the repetitive labor of laundering? From theology to material culture to the temporal constructions of Shakespeare, and from the politics of space to the poetics of typology, the essays in this volume take up diverse, complex models of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century temporality and contemplate their current relevance for our own ideas of history. The volume thus embraces the ambiguity inherent in the word "contemporary," moving between our subjects' sense of self-emplacement and the historiographical need to address the questions and concerns that affect us today.

Contributors: Douglas Bruster, Euan Cameron, Heather Dubrow, Kate Giles, Tim Harris, Natasha Korda, Julia Reinhard Lupton, Kristen Poole, Ethan H. Shagan, James Simpson, Nigel Smith, Mihoko Suzuki, Gordon Teskey, Julianne Werlin, Owen Williams, Steven N. Zwicker.

Recenzijas

"A provocative and illuminating volume. Its breadth of topics and approaches adds to its utility and appeal not only for literary scholars but also for historians. It will be the standard reference on historical periodization for years to come."-Zachary S. Schiffman, Northeastern Illinois University "Early Modern Histories of Time is a tremendously exciting and genuinely multidisciplinary collection of essays by historically engaged literary scholars juxtaposed with excellent contributions from political, religious, and archaeological historians."-Evelyn Tribble, University of Connecticut

Kristen Poole is the Blue and Gold Distinguished Professor of English Renaissance Literature at the University of Delaware. Her previous books include Supernatural Environments in Shakespeare's England and Radical Religion from Shakespeare to Milton: Figures of Nonconformity in Early Modern England. Owen Williams is Associate Director for Scholarly Programs, Folger Institute, Folger Shakespeare Library.