Indigenous Research Methodologies 2nd Revised edition [Mīkstie vāki]

  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 392 pages, height x width: 231x187 mm, weight: 650 g
  • Izdošanas datums: 29-Jan-2020
  • Izdevniecība: SAGE Publications Inc
  • ISBN-10: 1483333477
  • ISBN-13: 9781483333472
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  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 392 pages, height x width: 231x187 mm, weight: 650 g
  • Izdošanas datums: 29-Jan-2020
  • Izdevniecība: SAGE Publications Inc
  • ISBN-10: 1483333477
  • ISBN-13: 9781483333472
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:

Author Bagele Chilisa updates her groundbreaking book to give a new generation of scholars a crucial foundation in indigenous methods, methodologies, and epistemologies. This new edition of Indigenous Research Methodologies 
addresses the increasing emphasis in the classroom and in the field to sensitize researchers and students to diverse perspectives, especially those of women, minority groups, former colonized societies, indigenous peoples, historically oppressed communities, and people with disabilities. The second edition situates research in a larger historical, cultural, and global context so students can apply the specific methods that are commensurate with the transformative paradigm of social science research.

Chapters cover the history of research methods, ethical conduct, colonial and postcolonial epistemologies, relational epistemologies, emergent and indigenous methodologies, Afrocentric research, feminist research, narrative frameworks, interviewing, and participatory methods. New to the second edition are three new applied chapters covering evaluation, mixed methods, and a case study in mixed methods evaluation. These chapters focusing on decolonizing, indigenizing, and integrating these methods and applications to enhance participation of indigenous peoples as knowers and foster collaborative relationships.  Additional information on indigenous quantitative research reflects new developments in the field. New activities and web resources offer more depth and new ways for students to extend their knowledge. This book includes features such as key points, learning objectives, student exercises, chapter summaries, and suggested readings, making it an ideal course book for graduate-level students and applied researchers.


Preface xvi
Acknowledgments xxii
About the Author xxiii
Chapter 1 Situating Knowledge Systems
1(17)
Overview
1(1)
Learning Objectives
2(1)
Before You Start
2(1)
Introduction
2(3)
Terminology in Postcolonial Indigenous Research Methodologies
5(6)
Imperialism, Colonialism, and Othering Ideologies
6(3)
Postcolonial Indigenous Research
9(2)
Decolonization of Western Research Methodologies
11(5)
The Decolonization Process
12(2)
Strategies for Decolonization
14(2)
Summary
16(2)
Activity 1.1
16(1)
Key Points
16(1)
Suggested Readings
17(1)
Chapter 2 Research Paradigms
18(32)
Overview
18(1)
Learning Objectives
19(1)
Before You Start
19(1)
Contested Knowledge: Indigenous Perspectives or Paradigm?
19(4)
Indigenous Methodologies: Quantitative or Qualitative?
21(1)
Naming
22(1)
A Postcolonial Indigenous Research Paradigm
23(1)
Assumptions About the Nature of Reality, Knowledge, and Values
23(2)
Methodology
25(9)
Decolonization and Indigenization
26(2)
Overview of Methodology Frameworks in the Context of Indigenization and Decolonization
28(4)
Activity 2.1
32(2)
Euro-Western Research Paradigms
34(1)
The Positivism/Postpositivism Paradigm
35(2)
Assumptions About the Nature of Reality, Knowledge, and Values
36(1)
Activity 2.2
37(1)
The Interpretive Paradigm
38(3)
Assumptions About the Nature of Reality, Knowledge, and Values
39(2)
The Transformative Paradigm
41(4)
Assumptions About the Nature of Reality, Knowledge, and Values
42(1)
Activity 2.3
43(1)
The Pragmatic Paradigm
44(1)
Summary
45(5)
Key Points
48(1)
Activity 2.4
48(1)
Suggested Readings
48(2)
Chapter 3 Discovery and Recovery: Reading and Conducting Research Responsibly
50(22)
Overview
50(1)
Learning Objectives
51(1)
Before You Start
51(1)
Introduction
51(2)
Postcolonial and Indigenous Theories
53(2)
Postcolonial Theory Critique
54(1)
Research Aims
54(1)
Researching Back: Methodological Imperialism
55(5)
Resistance to Methodological Imperialism
57(1)
Academic Imperialism
58(1)
Analytical Tool: Blaut's Theory
59(1)
Postcolonial Theory and Language
60(6)
Indigenous Economic Concepts (T. Tsuruta, 2006)
61(1)
Literature and Deficit Theorizing
61(1)
Resistance to Dominant Literature
62(2)
Activity 3.1
64(2)
Critical Race Theories
66(3)
Activity 3.2
66(3)
Summary
69(3)
Key Points
69(1)
Activity 3.3
70(1)
Suggested Readings
70(2)
Chapter 4 Whose Reality Counts? Research Methods in Question
72(17)
Overview
72(1)
Learning Objectives
73(1)
Before You Start
73(1)
Colonizer/Colonized Dichotomies and the Ideology of the Other
73(2)
Dismissing Indigenous Ways of Knowing
75(7)
The Journey Into the Empire and Back
75(3)
The Error of Sameness
78(3)
The Exceptionality and Crisis Myth
81(1)
Research Ethics and the Legitimacy of Knowledge
82(4)
Activity 6.1
83(3)
Summary
86(3)
Key Points
87(1)
Activity 4.2
87(1)
Suggested Readings
88(1)
Chapter 5 Postcolonial Indigenous Research Paradigms
89(25)
Overview
89(1)
Learning Objectives
89(1)
Before You Start
90(1)
Indigenous Knowledge and Research
90(3)
Indigenous Knowledge and Knowledge Production
90(2)
Characteristics of Indigenous Knowledge
92(1)
The Role of Indigenous Knowledge in Research
92(1)
Indigenizing Research Methodologies
93(5)
Activity 5.1
96(2)
Postcolonial Indigenous Research Paradigms
98(1)
Relational Ontology in Context: Perspectives From Africa
98(4)
The I/We Obligation Versus the I/You: An Illustration
99(1)
Relations With the Living and the Nonliving: Implications for Research
99(2)
Spirituality, Love, and Harmony
101(1)
Relational Ontology: Perspectives From Scholars in Canada and Australia
102(2)
Relations With People
102(1)
Relations With the Environment/Land
103(1)
Relations With the Cosmos: The Role of Spirituality
103(1)
Relations With the Cosmos: An Illustration
103(1)
Relational Epistemologies
104(1)
Relational Axiology
105(1)
A Relational Axiology: African Perspectives
106(1)
Relational Axiology: Perspectives From North America and Canada
106(4)
Anonymity, Confidentiality, and Relations With People
107(1)
Activity 5.2
107(3)
Summary
110(4)
Key Points
111(1)
Activity 5.3
111(1)
Suggested Readings
112(2)
Chapter 6 Decolonizing Evaluation
114(33)
Overview
114(1)
Learning Objectives
115(1)
Before You Start
115(1)
Why Evaluation
115(3)
Evaluation Discourse in a Global Context
118(2)
Postpositivism and the Methods Branch
119(1)
Pragmatism and the Use Branch
119(1)
Constructivism and the Value Branch
119(1)
The Transformative Paradigm and the Social Justice Branch
119(1)
The Postcolonial Indigenous Paradigm and the Needs and Context Branch
120(1)
Blind Reliance on Eurocentric Tools
120(2)
Activity 6.1
121(1)
The Shift in Evaluation Practice
122(9)
Culture and Context Evaluation Models Context First Approach
124(1)
Perspectives From the American Indian Higher Education Consortium An Indigenous Evaluation Framework
125(2)
Evaluation Perspective from Hawaii and Aotearoa: The Value Added Approach
127(2)
Activity 6.2
129(1)
Blended Culturally Responsive Indigenous Evaluation
129(1)
Decolonizing Evaluation Through A Paradigmatic Lens: The Eastern Paradigm
129(1)
Nature of Reality
129(1)
Inquirer-Objective Relationship
129(1)
The Nature of Truth
130(1)
Attribution/Explanation of Action
130(1)
The Role of Values in Inquiry
131(1)
The Made in Africa Evaluation Perspective: A Paradigmatic Lens
131(1)
Decolonization Intent
132(3)
Relational Ontology
133(1)
Relational Epistemology
133(1)
Relational Axiology
134(1)
Methodology
134(1)
Activity 6.3
135(1)
Indigenous Multicultural Validity
136(5)
Conducting an Indigenous Evaluation
141(3)
Activity 6.4
142(1)
Activity 6.5
143(1)
Activity 6.6
144(1)
Summary
144(3)
Key Points
145(1)
Suggested Readings
145(2)
Chapter 7 Decolonizing Mixed Methods Research
147(22)
Overview
147(1)
Learning Objectives
148(1)
Before You Start
148(1)
Toward the Meaning of MMR
149(7)
Paradigms in MMR
154(1)
Postpositivist
154(1)
Constructivist
154(1)
Transformative
155(1)
Pragmatist
155(1)
Indigenous Paradigms
155(1)
Mixed Methods Designs and Rationales
156(1)
Activity 7.1
156(1)
Indigenous Mixed Methods Approaches
157(10)
Quantitative Western Knowledge, Qualitative Western Knowledge + Indigenous Knowledge
157(2)
Embedded Transformative Emergent Mixed Method Design
159(1)
The Nominal Group and Embedded Traditional Knowledge
159(1)
Conventional Qualitative Research + Qualitative Indigenous Research
159(2)
Quantitative Research + An Indigenous Worldview
161(6)
Summary
167(2)
Key Points
167(1)
Activity 7.2
168(1)
Suggested Readings
168(1)
Chapter 8 Indigenous Mixed Methods in Program Evaluation
169(17)
Overview
169(1)
Learning Objectives
170(1)
Before You Start
170(1)
The Indigenous Paradigmatic Lens
170(5)
A Relational Epistemology
171(1)
Preparing for the Program: Decolonizing Collaborative Research and Building Relationships
171(2)
Interrogating Power in Evaluation
173(2)
Embedding the Study in Global Knowledge
175(9)
Community Participation in Data Analysis
176(1)
Activity 8.1
177(1)
Creating Indigenous Statistical Constructs
177(4)
Indigenous Qualitative Evaluation Embedded in an Experimental Design
181(1)
Indigenous Conversation Methods
182(1)
The Shield as a Symbol of Protection
183(1)
Summary
184(2)
Key Points
184(1)
Activity 8.2
184(1)
Suggested Readings
185(1)
Chapter 9 Theorizing on Social Science Research Methods: Indigenous Perspectives
186(22)
Overview
187(1)
Learning Objectives
187(1)
Before You Start
187(1)
Introduction
187(1)
Methods Based on Ethnophilosophy
188(5)
Language, Metaphorical Sayings, and Proverbs
188(1)
Proverbs and Metaphors as Conceptual Frameworks
189(1)
Using Proverbs to Explore Community-Constructed Ideologies
190(1)
Activity 9.1
191(2)
Storytelling Methods
193(11)
Functions of a Story in Research
194(1)
Stories and Relational Accountability
195(1)
Folklores and the Design of Research Interventions: Maori Mythos
195(1)
Folktales as Counternarratives: The Batswana Story of Origin
196(1)
Contemporary Stories
197(1)
Self-Praise/Identity Stories
198(1)
Songs
198(2)
Stories From Research Interviews
200(1)
Storytelling and Spirituality
201(1)
Stories as Information Dissemination Avenues
201(2)
Activity 9.2
203(1)
In What Language Is the Story Told?
204(2)
Language Rights and Research
205(1)
Summary
206(2)
Key Points
207(1)
Activity 9.3
207(1)
Suggested Readings
207(1)
Chapter 10 Culturally Responsive Indigenous Research Methodologies
208(40)
Overview
208(1)
Learning Objectives
209(1)
Before You Start
209(1)
Regional, National, and Local Specific Methodologies
209(1)
Paradigm, Methodology, and Methods
210(2)
Validity and Reliability: An Overview
212(1)
Rigor in Qualitative Research
213(1)
Credibility
213(6)
Triangulation
214(1)
Referential Adequacy
215(1)
Reflexivity
215(1)
Transferability
216(1)
Dependability
217(1)
Confirmability
218(1)
Validity: A Postcolonial Indigenous Framework
219(1)
Accountability, Respectful Representation, Reciprocity, and Rights and Responsibilities
220(1)
Kaupapa Maori Research Methodology
221(5)
The Process and Methods of the Creative Relationship Framework
223(3)
Ethical Issues in the Creative Relationship Framework
226(1)
Activity 10.1
227(1)
Cyclical Postcolonial Indigenous Research Methodologies: The Medicine Wheel
227(2)
Pacific Research Methodologies
229(4)
The Talanoa Faafeletua Interview Methods
231(1)
Activity 10.2
231(2)
The Afrocentric Paradigm
233(8)
Culture and the Afrocentric Methodologies
234(1)
Religiosity
234(1)
Ubuntu and Respect for Self and Other Through Consensus Building
234(1)
Ubuntu and the Other: Respect for Particularity, Individuality, and Historicity
235(1)
Self-Determination and Rebirth
235(1)
Responsibilities of Researcher as Transformative Healer
236(1)
Researcher as Colonizer, Researched as Colonized
237(1)
Researcher as Knower/Teacher, Researched as Object/Subject/Known/Pupil
238(1)
Researcher as Redeemer, Researched as the Problem
239(2)
Ethics Built on a Deep Respect for Religious Beliefs and the Practices of Others
241(1)
Ethics That Underscore the Importance of Agreement and Consensus, Dialogue, and Particularity
241(4)
Activity 10.3
243(2)
Summary
245(3)
Key Points
246(1)
Activity 10.4
246(1)
Suggested Readings
246(2)
Chapter 11 Decolonizing the Interview Method
248(19)
Overview
248(1)
Learning Objectives
249(1)
Before You Start
249(1)
The Conventional Interview Method: An Overview
249(2)
The Interview Structure and Questions
249(1)
Interview Questions
250(1)
Postcolonial Indigenous Interview Methods
251(4)
The Pagtatanung-Tanong Interview Method From Indigenous Filipino Culture
252(1)
A Relational Interview Method: The Diviner/Client Construction of a Story
252(1)
A Relational Interview Method: The Focused Life-Story Interview
253(1)
Activity 11.1
253(1)
Philosophic Sagacity and the Interview Method
254(1)
Indigenous Focus Group Interviews
255(5)
Talking Circles
256(1)
Interviews and Data Analysis
257(2)
Interviews and Analysis Based on the Medicine Wheel
259(1)
Symbols in Postcolonial Indigenous Interview Methods
260(2)
The Kente and Bogolanfini Legend
260(2)
Conducting a Postcolonial Indigenous Interview
262(3)
Summary
265(2)
Key Points
265(1)
Activity 11.2
265(1)
Suggested Readings
266(1)
Chapter 12 Participatory Research Methods
267(26)
Overview
267(1)
Learning Objectives
268(1)
Before You Start
268(1)
Action Research: An Overview
268(9)
The Action Research Cycle
269(2)
Decolonization of Action Research
271(1)
Participant as Coresearcher
271(4)
Transformative Participatory Action Research
275(2)
Participatory Rural Appraisal
277(2)
PRA Techniques and the Survey Method
277(1)
Participatory Sampling Methods
278(1)
Village Mapping
279(1)
Other Methods
279(7)
Activity 12.1
280(1)
Appreciative Inquiry and Participatory Action Research
281(3)
Healing Participatory Action Research Methods
284(1)
Anishnaabe Symbol-Based Reflection
284(1)
Activity 12.2
285(1)
The Participatory Action Research Process
286(4)
Preparation
287(1)
Launching
288(1)
Data Collection
288(1)
Data Analysis
289(1)
Creating a Community Action Plan (CAP)
290(1)
Implementation, Monitoring, and Evaluation
290(1)
Summary
290(3)
Key Points
290(1)
Activity 12.3
291(1)
Suggested Readings
292(1)
Chapter 13 Postcolonial Indigenous Feminist Research Methodologies
293(25)
Overview
293(1)
Learning Objectives
294(1)
Before You Start
294(1)
Introduction
295(1)
Postcolonial Indigenous Feminist Theory and Research Methodologies
295(5)
Western Feminisms
300(6)
Liberal (or Bourgeois or Individualistic) Feminism
300(1)
Radical Feminism
300(1)
The Marxist Socialist Feminist Theory
301(1)
Postcolonial Indigenous Feminisms
301(1)
Activity 13.1
301(1)
Borderland-Mestizaje Feminism
302(1)
Multiple Epistemologies
303(1)
Activity 13.2
304(2)
African Feminisms and Black Feminisms
306(4)
Healing Methodologies
309(1)
Indigenous Feminist Participatory Methods in Practice
310(5)
Focus Group and the Use of a Magic Wooden Spoon
311(1)
The Use of a Basket
311(1)
Using Song as a Resistance Voice and a Healing Method
311(1)
Healing From Patriarchal Oppressive Ideologies: Small-Group Methods
312(1)
Stage 1 Goats, Interventions, and Strategies for the Initial Stage of the Group
313(1)
Stage 2 Makungutupeswa: Riddles
313(1)
Stage 3 Storytelling and Mbizi
314(1)
Stage 4 Skill-Building
314(1)
Stage 5 Continuation of Relationships and Beyond
314(1)
Summary
315(3)
Key Points
315(1)
Activity 13.3
316(1)
Suggested Readings
316(2)
Chapter 14 Building Partnerships and Integrating Knowledge Systems
318(18)
Overview
318(1)
Learning Objectives
319(1)
Before You Start
319(1)
Postcolonial Indigenous and Social Justice Working Relationships
320(4)
Researcher-Researched Relationships
320(2)
Institutional Ethics Protocols and the Researched
322(1)
Overcoming Researcher-Centric Research Projects
322(1)
Roles and Responsibilities of Researchers and Community Partners
323(1)
Cross-Cultural Partnership Research and Collaboration Between Academics and Donors
324(2)
Partnership of Knowledge Systems
325(1)
Planning Research From a Postcolonial Indigenous Research Perspective
326(7)
Orienting Decisions
326(1)
Research Design and Methodology
326(1)
Data Analysis
327(6)
Presenting and Reporting Results
333(1)
Summary
333(3)
Key Points
334(1)
Activity 14.1
334(1)
Suggested Readings
335(1)
References 336(17)
Index 353
Bagele Chilisa holds a Masters of Arts degree in Research Methodology. The degree covers Research Design, Statistics and Measurement from the University of Pittsburgh. She earned her PhD in Policy, Planning and Evaluation, also from the University of Pittsburgh. She is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Botswana. In the past 16 years years, she has taught the following courses to graduate and undergraduate students: Research Methods; Educational Evaluation; Constructing Questionnaires and Conducting Surveys; Project Design and Evaluation; Policy Planning and Evaluation. She is one of the founding members of the Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland and Namibia Research Association and served as President of the Botswana Educational Research Association from 2000 to 2002. She is also editor of the Botswana Educational Research Journal, board member of the University of Botswana Centre for Scientific Research and Indigenous Knowledge and Innovations and the University of Botswana Research Ethics Committee.