Symbolic Interaction in Society [Mīkstie vāki]

  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 296 pages, height x width x depth: 228x152x11 mm, weight: 363 g, 7 Graphs; 9 Tables, unspecified; 52 Halftones, black and white
  • Izdošanas datums: 03-Sep-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Rowman & Littlefield
  • ISBN-10: 1538101084
  • ISBN-13: 9781538101087
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  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 296 pages, height x width x depth: 228x152x11 mm, weight: 363 g, 7 Graphs; 9 Tables, unspecified; 52 Halftones, black and white
  • Izdošanas datums: 03-Sep-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Rowman & Littlefield
  • ISBN-10: 1538101084
  • ISBN-13: 9781538101087
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
Core text for the symbolic interaction course - often called "Self and Society" or "Individual and Society" - most often taught in sociology departments. Symbolic Interaction in Society offers a systematic application of symbolic interaction to everyday life. In addition to providing an overview of the theory and methods of symbolic interaction, it includes theory and research related to all of the relevant topics in sociology today: race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, social institutions, and social change. This book is written in a way that encourages students to employ symbolic interactionist concepts and principles throughout the text. Students are asked to put themselves into particular situations and consider how they would respond to the other people in that scenario. In doing so, students are able to see that human interaction is both stable and dynamic, that people can be predictable but that they also have agency, the ability to make number of decisions in a given situation. The goal is to show students the practical value of symbolic interaction for understanding their social lives today. Key features include: *Full review of symbolic interaction concepts and theories including a discussion of the nature of society and the role of the individual in society *Research applications of symbolic interaction examining major sociological outcomes such as inequality (race, class, gender and sexuality), deviance and mental health, social relationships, family and other social institutions, and social change *SI Online boxes include a review of how the principles of symbolic interaction apply to the effects of the Internet and modern communications on the individual and society *Personal Notes boxes share real student applications in which students describe how they have employed symbolic interaction in their personal lives *Original Work features one short excerpt from a book or journal article in every chapter *Pedagogical devices such as chapter objectives, key terms, and end of chapter key terms and critical thinking questions guide students through each chapter
Preface xi
1 The Social Construction of Reality
1(22)
This Book Isn't Real!
2(11)
Basic Principles
4(3)
Everything Is Not Relative!
7(1)
A Situational Approach
8(5)
The Construction of Society
13(5)
The Individual in Society
15(3)
Cognitive Sociology
18(1)
Two Schools of Symbolic Interaction
18(2)
Chapter Conclusion
20(3)
2 Studying Symbolic Interaction
23(28)
Quantitative versus Qualitative Methods
25(3)
Verstehen Power
27(1)
Exploration and Inspection
27(1)
Studying Situations
28(16)
Types of Ethnography
33(5)
Qualitative Interviewing
38(3)
Narrative Analysis
41(1)
Ethnomethodology and Natural Experiments
41(2)
Unobtrusive Research
43(1)
Going into the Field
44(4)
Project Planning
44(1)
Sampling
45(1)
Ethical Issues
46(2)
Chapter Conclusion
48(3)
3 Constructing Culture
51(28)
Elements of Culture
51(10)
Statuses, Roles, and Norms
55(3)
Values and Beliefs
58(3)
American Culture
61(7)
American Values and Beliefs
62(3)
American Ideal-Type Personalities
65(1)
Baudrillard's America
66(2)
Creating Cultures
68(8)
Subcultures and Idiocultures
68(3)
Global Culture?
71(2)
Cultural Change
73(3)
Chapter Conclusion
76(3)
4 Self and Society
79(24)
The I, the Me, and the Self
80(7)
Situational Selves
84(1)
Self-Narratives and Possible Selves
85(2)
Identity Theories
87(6)
Identity Theory
89(2)
Social Identity Theory
91(2)
Dramaturgy
93(6)
Front Stage/Backstage
94(1)
Impressions Given/Impressions Given Off
95(4)
Chapter Conclusion
99(4)
5 Socialization
103(30)
Cognitive Socialization
105(5)
Symbols and Language
107(1)
Stages of Socialization
107(3)
Agents of Socialization
110(7)
Family
111(1)
Peers
112(1)
Schools
113(2)
Media and Self-Socialization
115(2)
The Sociology of Childhood
117(3)
Socialization over the Life Course
120(9)
Our Role in History
121(2)
Life Stages: Presocialization to Adult Socialization
123(6)
Chapter Conclusion
129(4)
6 Emotions, Relationships, and Society
133(24)
Contextualizing Emotions
134(8)
Dramaturgy and Emotions
137(1)
Emotional Scripts
137(2)
Emotional Socialization
139(3)
Relationships, Community, and Society
142(12)
Attraction: Starting a Relationship
144(3)
The Socioemotional Economy
147(3)
Community Relations
150(4)
Chapter Conclusion
154(3)
7 Deviance and Mental Health
157(22)
Defining Normal
157(7)
Levels of Deviance
159(1)
Creating Deviance
160(2)
Moral Entrepreneurs
162(2)
Labeling and De-Labeling
164(5)
Primary and Secondary Deviance
164(2)
Deviant Subcultures
166(2)
Deviance over the Life Course
168(1)
The Myth of Mental Illness
169(6)
Chapter Conclusion
175(4)
8 Doing Inequality
179(20)
Status Everywhere!
180(4)
Doing Difference
184(5)
Doing Gender
185(2)
Intersectionality
187(2)
Pride and Prejudice
189(8)
Categorizing Self and Other
189(3)
Borderwork
192(5)
Chapter Conclusion
197(2)
9 Institutional Life
199(24)
The Nature of Social Institutions
199(3)
Institutional Types
202(12)
All in the Family
202(3)
Work and Occupations: The Economy
205(3)
Education
208(1)
Religion and Politics
209(5)
Institutional Intersections and Innovations
214(6)
Chapter Conclusion
220(3)
10 Collective Behavior
223(22)
The Maddening Crowd
224(4)
Mass Hysteria
224(2)
Circular Reaction
226(2)
New Social Movements
228(5)
Emergent Norm Theory
229(1)
Value-Added Theory
230(3)
The Anatomy of Collective Thoughts and Behavior
233(8)
Collective Memory, Identity, and Imagination
234(2)
Collective Behaviors
236(5)
Chapter Conclusion
241(4)
Glossary 245(10)
References 255(16)
Index 271
David Rohall is the Department Head and Professor of Sociology at Missouri State University. His research emphasizes the application of symbolic interactionist principles to any number of topics including self-esteem, identity, and mental health. His previous works include, Social Psychology: Sociological Perspectives, 3rd Edition (2014) and Inclusion in the American Military: A Force for Diversity (2017).