Community Equity Audits: Communities and Schools Working Together to Eliminate the Opportunity Gap [Mīkstie vāki]

(San Joaquin Community Data Co-Op Executive Director), , (Modesto Junior College), (Texas A&m University College Station - Professor Emeritus), (Grace Davis High School Literacy Coach)
  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 136 pages, height x width: 254x177 mm, weight: 280 g
  • Izdošanas datums: 14-Feb-2020
  • Izdevniecība: SAGE Publications Inc
  • ISBN-10: 1544360967
  • ISBN-13: 9781544360966
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  • Mīkstie vāki
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  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 136 pages, height x width: 254x177 mm, weight: 280 g
  • Izdošanas datums: 14-Feb-2020
  • Izdevniecība: SAGE Publications Inc
  • ISBN-10: 1544360967
  • ISBN-13: 9781544360966
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
This book addresses equity auditing at the community level. The inspiration for the book emerged from two sources. The first was hearing the frustration expressed from school leaders and teachers when trying to address the educational needs of and expectations for their students while also having to contend with the socio-structural issues that function as roadblocks to their success, particularly for low-income students and those living in poverty. These include lack of sufficient housing, exposure to high levels of crime and violence, inadequate fresh and nutritious food, deficient healthcare, and an absence of community resources such as safe play spaces. The second was the realization that many of the citizens within a city or school district are unaware of the disparate conditions among their neighborhoods and communities, including those stakeholders who are in a position to make needed policy changes. The purpose, then, of this book is to provide examples of community equity audits, using geographic information system mapping and other data. These audits create a picture and story of the inequities among communities and the need for community equity audits to raise the awareness of those who can influence policy and practices to create communities that promote the health and well-being of their citizens, most especially their children, so that the opportunity gap can be eliminated and schools can well-educate all of their students. The need for this information is great because schools alone cannot achieve all their educational goals if students and their families are living in circumstances that negatively impact their health, well-being and ultimately their chances to succeed. This book attempts to help practitioners and university faculty address what we believe is the most challenging and important issue in education today-how to ensure that all students have the opportunity and support they need to be successful in school and life.
Foreword by Terah Venzant Chambers Preface Acknowledgments About the Authors
1. PROLOGUE
2. EQUITY AUDITS OVERVIEW Preview of
Chapters 3 Through 11
3. HOW WE GOT STARTED ON OUR COMMUNITY EQUITY AUDIT Windshield Surveys Place Matters Social Determinants of Health (SDH) Discussion Questions Activities
4. CONDUCTING A COMMUNITY EQUITY AUDIT Assessing the Need to Do a Community Equity Audit Conducting the Audit Summary
5. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH ONE: SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS/POVERTY Evidence Base for the Effect of Socioeconomic Status/Poverty Poverty Level Household Income Unemployment Food Security and Government Assistance Summary Discussion Questions
6. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH TWO: AVAILABILITY OF AFFORDABLE AND SAFE HOUSING Evidence Base for the Effect of Availability of Affordable and Safe Housing Homeownership Residential Stability Quality of Housing Affordability of Housing Lack of Housing or Homelessness Summary Discussion Questions
7. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH THREE: EXPOSURE TO CRIME AND VIOLENCE Evidence Base for the Effects of Exposure to Crime and Violence Crime and Violence Levels Effects of Exposure to Crime and Violence on Physical and Social Health Effects of Exposure to Violent Crime on Cognitive Performance Summary Discussion Questions
8. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH FOUR: AVAILABILITY OF AND ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE Evidence Base for the Effect of Availability of and Access to Health Care Health Insurance Coverage Access to Health Care Facilities Summary Discussion Questions
9. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH FIVE: AVAILABILITY OF AND ACCESS TO COMMUNITY RESOURCES Evidence Base for the Availability of and Access to Community Resources Access to Healthy Food The Built Environment Summary Discussion Questions
10. SO WHAT? WHAT WE FOUND AND WHAT IT MEANS Meritocracy Freedoms/Unfreedoms and Desperate Choices
11. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS Appendix A. Resources for Social Determinants of Health Appendix B. Determining the Census Tracts Within a School Attendance Zone to Access Census Demographic Data Appendix C. How to Get Data for SDH 1: Socioeconomic Status/Poverty Appendix D. How to Get Data for SDH 2: Availability of Affordable and Safe Housing Appendix E. How to Get Data for SDH 3: Exposure to Crime and Violence Crime Type Symbols and Definitions Used by Crime Mapping Appendix F. How to Get Data for SDH 4: Availability of and Access to Health Care Appendix G. How to Get Data for SDH 5: Availability of and Access to Community Resources Access to Healthy Food Built Environment: Greenspaces/Parks Walk Score and Bike Score Pedestrian-Oriented Road Network Density References Index
Kathryn Bell McKenzie is professor emerita of Advanced Studies in Education at California State University, Stanislaus and associate professor emerita of Educational Administration and Human Resource Development at Texas A&M University. At California State, Kathryn was director of the EdD program in Educational Leadership and at Texas A&M, she was coordinator for the PhD in K-12 Educational Leadership.Prior to becoming a professor,Kathryn was a public school educator serving as a teacher, curriculum specialist, assistant principal,and principal for nearly twenty-five years. She was also the deputy director of the Austin Independent School District Leadership Academy. She has an international reputation with both P-12 and university educators who have used her work on equity traps and equity audits to improve educational practices that advance equity and excellence. She has numerous journal publications and books and is an educational consultant,writer, and speaker. J. Martyn Gunn, professor emeritus at Texas A&M University,has over forty-one years of experience in higher education. A biochemist by training, he rose through the ranks before transitioning to academic leadership at the departmental and university level. At this point in his career, he became interested in undergraduate education,especially in science, and the pedagogy of teaching science so that students could master and comprehend the subject without rote memorization. He garnered teaching awards at the college and university level and held successive positions as the dean of undergraduates, associate provost, and vice provost before retiring.Subsequently, he accepted a position as vice-president for student success at CSU Stanislaus, a Hispanic serving institution, where he used his analytical background to analyze and disaggregate graduation rates and where he continued his interest in helping students, especially first-generation students, succeed before retiring a second time. Talitha Agan is an adjunct history professor at Modesto Junior College where her teaching focus is women's studies, far western frontier and American history in general. She graduated with honors earning a doctorate of educational leadership from California State University, Stanislaus, where she also holds a master's in history. Her educational research interests include educational equity issues in the Central Valley of California, whereas her historical research interests include the environmental and social aspects of western settlement, especially in the Central Valley, and the local history of her hometown Modesto, California. Campbell John Bullock is a lecturer in the Sociology and Gerontology Department at California State University, Stanislaus, where he teaches research methods and research analysis, and an adjunct associate professor of sociology at San Joaquin Delta College in Stockton,California. In addition,Campbell is the executive director for an applied social research and evaluation organization,the San Joaquin Community Data Co-Op. He has seventeen years of applied social research experience and has worked on state, federal, and local research and evaluation projects. He holds a doctorate in educational leadership from California State University, Stanislaus, and a master's degree in sociology from San Jose State University. His interests in the field of educational leadership include combating inequities for P-20 students, education and social change in impoverished communities,teaching pedagogy and leadership in the community college setting, and research and evaluation in college and community settings. Amelia Herrera-Evans is a high school English language development teacher within the Language Institute at Grace Davis High School in Modesto, California. She is passionate about her work with immigrant, refugee, and asylum-seeking students and is developing with her colleagues a charter school to serve the newcomer population in a way that not only develops and strengthens their English literacy skills,but also equips them with the type of education and opportunities that will set them up for post-secondary success. In addition, Amelia is the state treasurer for the United Black Student Unions of California (UBSUC), where she is working with the board president and fellow members to develop a course of study on African and African American history to serve as core curriculum for the Black Student Union clubs across California. Amelia holds a doctorate of educational leadership degree from California State University, Stanislaus.