Ethical Approaches to Human Remains: A Global Challenge in Bioarchaeology and Forensic Anthropology 1st ed. 2019 [Hardback]

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  • Formāts: Hardback, 649 pages, height x width: 235x155 mm, weight: 1490 g, 50 Illustrations, color; XXVII, 649 p. 50 illus. in color., 1 Hardback
  • Izdošanas datums: 02-Jan-2020
  • Izdevniecība: Springer Nature Switzerland AG
  • ISBN-10: 3030329259
  • ISBN-13: 9783030329259
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  • Formāts: Hardback, 649 pages, height x width: 235x155 mm, weight: 1490 g, 50 Illustrations, color; XXVII, 649 p. 50 illus. in color., 1 Hardback
  • Izdošanas datums: 02-Jan-2020
  • Izdevniecība: Springer Nature Switzerland AG
  • ISBN-10: 3030329259
  • ISBN-13: 9783030329259
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This book is the first of its kind, combining international perspectives on the current ethical considerations and challenges facing bioarchaeologists in the recovery, analysis, curation, and display of human remains. It explores how museum curators, commercial practitioners, forensic anthropologists, and bioarchaeologists deal with ethical issues pertaining to human remains in traditional and digital settings around the world. 
 
The book not only raises key ethical questions concerning the study, display, and curation of skeletal remains that bioarchaeologists must face and overcome in different countries, but also explores how this global community can work together to increase awareness of similar and, indeed, disparate ethical considerations around the world and how they can be addressed in working practices. 
 
The key aspects addressed include ethics in bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology, the excavation, curation, and display of human remains, repatriation, and new imaging techniques. As such, the book offers an ideal guide for students and practitioners in the fields of bioarchaeology, osteoarchaeology, forensic anthropology, medical anthropology, archaeology, anatomy, museum and archive studies, and philosophy, detailing how some ethical dilemmas have been addressed and which future dilemmas need to be considered.
Philosophical approaches to the ethics of bioarchaeology.- The scientific value of human remains.- History and ethics of bioarchaeology.- Excavation of human remains.- Analysis of human remains.- Curation of human remains.- Repatriation of human remains.- Displaying the dead.- Religions and ethics.- Funerary aspects of ethics.- Imaging techniques and the rise of social media.- Ethics in Forensic Anthropology.- Case Studies.- Closing Remarks and Future Directions and Challenges.
Kirsty Squires is a Senior Lecturer in Forensic Anthropology and MSc Forensic Science award leader at Staffordshire University. Kirsty's primary research interests lie in the analysis and interpretation of burned skeletal remains from archaeological and forensic contexts, early medieval funerary archaeology, the archaeology of childhood, and ethical considerations within osteoarchaeology and forensic anthropology. She has over 10 years of experience in the excavation and analysis of human skeletal remains. Kirsty is the Outreach Officer for the Society for the Study of Childhood in the Past and a Research Associate of the Observatory for the Mummified Heritage of Sicily, Santa Lucia del Mela. David Errickson is a Lecturer in Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology at Cranfield Forensic Institute, Cranfield University, UK. David has a research focus on 3D technology and its use in quantitative analysis, learning, and teaching. David has a passion for ethical discussion and is a co-creator of the ethical forum on digital osteology; a discussion group on ethical considerations with regards to human remains. Likewise, David has co-edited the new British Association for Biological Anthropology and Osteoarchaeology ethical guidance on the use of 2D and 3D images pertaining to human remains. Finally, David has co-authored a chapter with Dr. Nicholas Marquez-Grant on ethical considerations with regards to 3D imaging. Nicholas Marquez-Grant is a Senior Lecturer and the MSc Course Director in Forensic Archaeology and Anthropology at Cranfield Forensic Institute, Cranfield University, UK. He is also a Research Affiliate at the School of Anthropology and Museum Ethnography, University of Oxford, UK. He has over 20 years of experience in the excavation and analysis of human remains from a variety of archaeological contexts and is increasingly working on ethical aspects in bioarchaeology and forensic anthropology. As a forensic practitioner, he has acted in the UK as an expert witness in Forensic Anthropology and Archaeology.