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Three Brothers: Memories of My Family [Hardback]

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  • Formāts: Hardback, 304 pages, height x width x depth: 213x140x25 mm, weight: 318 g
  • Izdošanas datums: 26-Mar-2020
  • Izdevniecība: Black Cat
  • ISBN-10: 0802148085
  • ISBN-13: 9780802148087
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  • Cena: 27,43 EUR
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  • Formāts: Hardback, 304 pages, height x width x depth: 213x140x25 mm, weight: 318 g
  • Izdošanas datums: 26-Mar-2020
  • Izdevniecība: Black Cat
  • ISBN-10: 0802148085
  • ISBN-13: 9780802148087
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
An award-winning and highly regarded Chinese writer paints a vivid picture of rural Henan Province in the 1960s and 1970s by describing the extraordinary lives of his father and uncles during a politically devastating period.

"In this heartfelt, intimate memoir, Yan Lianke brings the reader into his childhood home in Song County in Henan Province, painting a vivid portrait of rural China in the 1960s and '70s and chronicling the extraordinary lives of his father and uncles, as well as his own. Yan's parents are so poor that they can only afford to use wheat flour on New Year and festival days, and as a child he dreams of fried scallion buns, and once steals from his father to buy a sesame seed cake. Yan yearns to leave the village, however he can, and soon novels become an escape. He resolves to become a writer himself after reading on the back of a novel that its author was given leave to remain in the city of Harbin after publishing her book. In the evenings, after finishing back-breaking shifts hauling stones at a cement factory, sometimes sixteen hours long, he sets to work writing. A career in the Army ultimately allows Yan to escape village life, but he is filled with regrets as he recalls these years of scarcity, turmoil, and poverty. A powerful portrait of the trials of daily life, as well as a philosophical meditation on grief, death, home, and fate, and gleaming throughout with Yan's quick wit and gift for imagery, Three Brothers is a personal portrait of a politically devastating period, and a celebration of the power of the family to hold together even in the harshest circumstances"--

The English-language nonfiction debut one of China’s most highly regarded writers, winner of the Franz Kafka Prize and twice finalist for the International Booker Prize, Three Brothers is a beautiful and heartwrenching memoir of the author’s childhood and family life during the Cultural Revolution

From one of China’s most highly regarded writers, winner of the Franz Kafka Prize and twice finalist for the International Booker Prize, Three Brothers is a beautiful and heartwrenching memoir of the author’s childhood and family life during the Cultural Revolution

In this heartfelt, intimate memoir, Yan Lianke brings the reader into his childhood home in Song County in Henan Province, painting a vivid portrait of rural China in the 1960s and ’70s. Three Brothers is a literary testament to the great humanity and small joys that exist even in times of darkness.

With lyricism and deep emotion, Yan chronicles the extraordinary lives of his father and uncles, as well as his own. Living in a remote village, Yan’s parents are so poor that they can only afford to use wheat flour on New Year and festival days, and while Yan dreams of fried scallion buns, and even steals from his father to buy sesame seed cakes. He yearns to leave the village, however he can, and soon novels become an escape. He resolves to become a writer himself after reading on the back of a novel that its author was given leave to remain in the city of Harbin after publishing her book. In the evenings, after finishing back-breaking shifts hauling stones at a cement factory, sometimes sixteen hours long, he sets to work writing. He is ultimately delivered from the drudgery and danger of manual labor by a career in the Army, but he is filled with regrets as he recalls these years of scarcity, turmoil, and poverty.

A philosophical portrait of grief, death, home, and fate that gleams with Yan’s quick wit and gift for imagery, Three Brothers is a personal portrait of a politically devastating period, and a celebration of the power of the family to hold together even in the harshest circumstances.

Recenzijas

Praise for Three Brothers"Full of love, sorrow, and tenderness, Yan Lianke's memoir offers a deeply heartfelt account of his family in the 1960s and 70s. Three Brothers is a must read for anyone who wants to understand post-Mao China and a new opportunity to experience more of what this extraordinary author conveys to us with his vivid and poetic style."--Xiaolu Guo, author of Nine Continents Praise for The Day the Sun Died New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Named a Best Book of the Year by Publishers Weekly Named a Best Fiction in Translation Selection by Kirkus Reviews An Amazon Best Book of the Month "China's most controversial novelist . . . [ A] preternatural gift for metaphor spills out of him unbidden."--Jiayang Fan, New Yorker "A poetic nightmare . . . The Day the Sun Died is set in the course of a single, perpetual summer day and night in which the inhabitants of a small village in China rise from their slumber and sleepwalk through town."--NPR, "Weekend Edition" "Yan is one of those rare geniuses who finds in the peculiar absurdities of his own culture the absurdities that infect all cultures . . . [ The Day the Sun Died is] the creepiest book I've read in years: a social comedy that bleeds like a zombie apocalypse . . . Yan's understated wit runs through these pages like a snake through fallen leaves . . . Invokes that fluid dream state in which everything represents something else, something deeper . . . A wake-up call about the path we're on."--Ron Charles, Washington Post "Gripping . . . Yan's fable, joining a long lineage of so-called 'records of anomalies' in Chinese literature, forces readers to reflect on the side of the world that is 'too absurd, too cruel and too unpleasant.' . . . Yan's subject is China, but he has condensed the human forces driving today's global upheavals into a bracing, universal vision."--Julian Gewirtz, New York Times Book Review "Revelatory . . . Disgust and hope fight it out, as the reader sits ringside."--New York "Floats between surrealism, sci-fi, horror, and absurdism, while never letting go of its satirical eye. Yet the language and structure of the novel reads more like Samuel Beckett or James Joyce than it does The Handmaid's Tale . . . Bears the largesse and cadence of myth, but it is also the story of a family, told by a simple boy of fourteen. Yan's physical descriptions can be rich and specific, grounded in realism, but also far-fetched and steeped in surprising metaphor . . . No matter where we live, this is our story, too, or could be, if things don't change."--Ploughshares "By turns terrifying, violent, satirical, and darkly funny."--South China Morning Post "Yan trains his fantastical, satiric eye on China's policy of forced cremation in this chilling novel about the 'great somnambulism' that seizes a rural town . . . A riveting, powerful reading experience."--Publishers Weekly (starred review) "Yan's novel belongs in the company of Juan Rulfo's Pedro Paramo and even James Joyce's Ulysses."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review) "Dark and sinister . . . In his unflinching satire, Lianke shows an incredible mastery of words, both brilliantly humorous and offbeat, making this novel a gripping read."--Booklist "This exuberant but sinister fable confirms its author as one of China's most audacious and enigmatic novelists . . . His writing--resourcefully translated by Carlos Rojas--feels both ancient and modern, folkloric and avant-garde . . . [ Lianke] seeds his reader's imagination, and his outlandish fantasia germinates many varieties of interpretation."--Economist "Explores with a strange elegance and dark, masterful experiment these twin themes of night and death, dreams and reality . . . A brave and unforgettable novel, full of tragic poise and political resonance, masterfully shifting between genres and ways of storytelling, exploring the ways in which history and memory are resurrected, how dark, private desires seep or flood out."--Irish Times "The Day the Sun Died takes on Xi Jinping's 'Chinese dream'--a promise to restore China to a position of global importance . . . Yan's disgust for his country's moral degradation is unmistakable: a predatory ruling party exploiting its people even in death."--Guardian "In this novel, dreams suggest that the present is still haunted by nightmares . . . Remarkable."--Scotsmam "Powerful . . . Poignant and unsettling."--Mail on Sunday "Gloriously defiant . . . Sophisticated in the layered, gothic excesses of its allegorical zombie narrative . . . A powerful, captivating work of art."--South China Morning Post Praise for Yan Lianke Winner of the Franz Kafka Prize Two-Time Finalist for the Man Booker International Prize "One of China's eminent and most controversial novelists and satirists."--Chicago Tribune "His talent cannot be ignored."--New York Times "China's foremost literary satirist . . . He deploys offbeat humor, anarchic set pieces and surreal imagery to shed new light on dark episodes from modern Chinese history."--Financial Times "[ Yan is] criticizing the foundations of the Chinese state and the historical narrative on which it is built, while still somehow remaining one of its most lauded writers."--New Republic "One of China's most successful writers . . . He writes in the spirit of the dissident writer Vladimir Voinovich, who observed that 'reality and satire are the same.'"--New Yorker "There is nothing magical about Yan Lianke's realism . . . [ with his] unflinching eye that nevertheless leaves you blinking with the whirling absurdities of the human condition."--Independent "One of China's most important--and certainly most fearless--living writers."--Kirkus Reviews "The work of the Chinese author Yan Lianke reminds us that free expression is always in contention--to write is to risk the hand of power."--Guardian

Yan Lianke is the author of numerous story collections and novels, including The Day the Sun Died; The Years, Months, Days; The Explosion Chronicles; The Four Books; Lenin's Kisses; Serve the People!; and Dream of Ding Village. Among many accolades, he was awarded the Franz Kafka Prize, he was twice a finalist for the Man Booker International Prize, and he has been shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize, the Man Asian Literary Prize, and the Prix Femina Etranger. He has received two of China's most prestigious literary honors, the Lu Xun Prize and the Lao She Award.