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Dissertations and Theses From Start to Finish: Psychology and Related Fields 3rd Revised edition [Mīkstie vāki]

  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 386 pages, height x width: 254x178 mm, 5 figures, 3 tables, 20 exhibits
  • Izdošanas datums: 30-Oct-2019
  • Izdevniecība: American Psychological Association
  • ISBN-10: 1433830647
  • ISBN-13: 9781433830648
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  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 386 pages, height x width: 254x178 mm, 5 figures, 3 tables, 20 exhibits
  • Izdošanas datums: 30-Oct-2019
  • Izdevniecība: American Psychological Association
  • ISBN-10: 1433830647
  • ISBN-13: 9781433830648
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
This book guides students though the practical, logistical, and emotional struggles that come with writing dissertations and theses.
 

For over twenty-five years, Dissertations and Theses from Start to Finish: Psychology and Related Fields has guided student writers through the practical, logistical, and emotional struggles that come with writing dissertations and theses.  It offers guidance to students through all the essential steps, including:

-Defining topics;
-Selecting faculty advisors;
-Scheduling time to work on the project, and;
-Conducting, analyzing, writing, presenting, and publishing research.

This fully-updated third edition includes guiding questions, checklists, diagrams, and sample research papers.  It also reflects the most recent advances in online research and includes fully updated online resources. Each chapter begins with an Advance Organizer that offers an at-a-glance summary of chapter content and applicability for different types of readers. Chapters also include significantly expanded To Do and Supplemental Resource lists, as well as helpful suggestions for dealing with impasses and common internal and external “traps” that recur throughout the writing process. The authors also provide a thoughtful consideration of the variety of roles faculty advisors play, and of variations in the thesis and dissertation process and requirements across institutions of higher learning.
 
Foreword ix
Mitchell J. Prinstein
Preface xi
1 What Are Theses and Dissertations, and Why Write a Book About Them?
3(10)
How This Book Is Organized
5(1)
Definitions, Distinctions, and Functions
6(1)
What Theses and Dissertations Look Like
7(3)
Why Do a Thesis or Dissertation in the First Place?
10(1)
Find What Works for You
11(2)
2 Starting Out: Assessing Your Preparation for the Task Ahead
13(20)
Are You Ready?
14(2)
Interpret Your Checklist Responses
16(13)
Examine Your Cognitive Ecology
29(1)
Get Ready for the Task Ahead
30(1)
Supplemental Resources
31(2)
3 Time and Trouble Management
33(14)
Start With Goals
34(1)
List Your Steps and Estimate Your Time Requirements
34(2)
Schedule the Work
36(2)
Plan Your Schedule to Free Yourself
38(2)
Minimize Procrastination and Avoidance
40(5)
Supplemental Resources
45(2)
4 Finding Topics and Faculty Collaborators
47(36)
Select a Research Area
48(5)
Identify Your Chair
53(12)
Develop Your Research Question
65(7)
Develop Carefully Worded Hypotheses
72(6)
Recruit Committee Members
78(4)
Supplemental Resources
82(1)
5 Formulating and Communicating Your Plans: An Overview of the Proposal
83(14)
Understand the Functions of the Thesis or Dissertation Proposal
84(1)
Know the Elements of the Thesis or Dissertation Proposal
85(8)
Investigate the General Proposal Process
93(4)
6 Reviewing the Literature
97(36)
Locate Sources of Relevant Literature
98(3)
Conduct Your Search
101(4)
Collect and Organize Relevant Information
105(1)
Critically Read What You Found
106(8)
Prepare to Write Your Literature Review
114(6)
Start Writing
120(6)
Synthesize and Critically Analyze the Literature
126(6)
Supplemental Resources
132(1)
7 Research Methodology and Ethics
133(26)
Know the Elements of a Method Section
134(13)
Be Prepared to Conduct Ethical Research
147(9)
Supplemental Resources
156(3)
8 Measuring Study Variables
159(26)
Operationalize Your Variables
160(2)
Know the Important Aspects of Potential Instruments
162(7)
Look Broadly for Appropriate Measures
169(2)
Know What to Do if Vital Psychometric Information Is Unavailable
171(6)
Adapt Others' Measures With Caution
177(1)
Avoid Common Errors in Evaluating and Selecting Measures
178(1)
Get Copies of Instruments
179(3)
Supplemental Resources
182(3)
9 Selecting the Appropriate Data Analysis Approaches
185(44)
Beef Up Your Statistical Knowledge Early
187(1)
Examine Your Research Questions and Create Your Analysis Plan
187(10)
Consider Group Comparison Statistics
197(7)
Consider Correlational Statistics
204(8)
Consider Model-Testing Approaches
212(3)
Set Your Alpha Levels
215(1)
Be Careful With Nonindependent Data
216(2)
Beware of Causal Terminology
218(1)
Use Consultation Prudently
219(2)
Seek Additional Assistance if You Are Still Confused
221(1)
Write Your Analysis Section
221(4)
Supplemental Resources
225(4)
10 Collecting, Managing, and Analyzing the Data
229(28)
Pilot Test Your Procedures
230(2)
Recruit and Train Assistants
232(2)
Build in Ethical Safeguards
234(2)
Schedule Settings and Arrange Materials
236(2)
Plan for the Unexpected
238(2)
Collect the Data
240(1)
Score, Check, and Prepare to Analyze the Data
241(7)
Complete Preliminary Analyses
248(1)
Turn to Your Primary Analyses
249(3)
Conduct Supplemental Exploratory Analyses
252(2)
Supplemental Resources
254(3)
11 Presenting the Results
257(24)
First, Do Some Basic Housekeeping
259(1)
Present Your Primary Analyses
260(6)
Describe Supplemental Analyses
266(1)
Prepare Appropriate Tables
266(5)
Prepare Suitable Figures
271(7)
Supplemental Resources
278(3)
12 Discussing the Results
281(20)
Update Your Literature Review and Method Section
282(10)
Include Comments About Future Directions
292(1)
Use These Tips to Organize and Write Your Discussion
293(2)
Produce the Final Product
295(4)
Supplemental Resource
299(2)
13 Managing Committee Meetings: Proposal and Oral Defense
301(28)
The Proposal Meeting
304(3)
The Oral Defense
307(18)
Finishing Touches
325(2)
Supplemental Resources
327(2)
14 Presenting Your Project to the World
329(28)
Publish It Online First
331(3)
Present It in Person
334(10)
Publish Your Study
344(9)
Consider Dividing Major Projects for Multiple Submissions
353(1)
Weigh the Benefits of Dissemination in the Popular Press
354(2)
Supplemental Resources
356(1)
References 357(18)
Index 375(18)
About the Authors 393
Debora Bell, PhD is Director of Clinical Training for the clinical psychology doctoral program at the University of Missouri, and Executive Director of the MU Psychological Services Clinic I also direct our new Center for Evidence-Based Youth Mental Health. In these roles, I am proud to part of outstanding education of our graduate students in clinical science research and evidence-based clinical practice, as well as part of our program's strong contributions to the scientific literature and evidence-based services delivery in the community. She lives in Columbia, MO. John D. Cone, PhD, earned his BA in Psychology from Stanford University and his MS and PhD from the University of Washington. He has taught at the University of Puget Sound, West Virginia University, the University of Hawaii, United States International University, San Diego State University, and Alliant International University. His research interests include the development of idiographic assessment methodology; autism intervention; and the development, implementation, and evaluation of large-scale service delivery systems, especially those for individuals with developmental disabilities. He lives in San Diego, CA. Sharon L. Foster, Ph.D., is a distinguished professor at Alliant International University in San Diego, California. She received her Ph.D. in psychology in 1978 from the State University of New York at Stony Brook after completing a clinical internship at the University of Washington Medical School. She has served as an associate editor for Behavioral Assessment and the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. She is the author of numerous books, articles and book chapters on children's peer relations, assessment and treatment of parent-adolescent conflict, and research methodology. She lives in San Francisco, CA.