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Embracing Bell Beaker: Adopting new Ideas and Objects across Europe during the later 3rd Millennium BC (c. 2600-2000 BC) [Hardback]

  • Formāts: Hardback, 290 pages, height x width: 280x210 mm, 91fc
  • Sērija : Scales of Transformation 2
  • Izdošanas datums: 15-May-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Sidestone Press
  • ISBN-10: 9088907544
  • ISBN-13: 9789088907548
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  • Cena: 203,79 €
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  • Formāts: Hardback, 290 pages, height x width: 280x210 mm, 91fc
  • Sērija : Scales of Transformation 2
  • Izdošanas datums: 15-May-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Sidestone Press
  • ISBN-10: 9088907544
  • ISBN-13: 9789088907548
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
This book investigates how local communities across Europe adopt the Bell Beaker phenomenon during the 3rd millennium BC.

This book deals with the question how communities across Europe during the later 3rd millennium BC adopt and transform the Bell Beaker phenomenon differently. By looking at these processes of change from the perspective of settlements and settlement material culture, an interpretation is given to the development of this phenomenon that is alternative to the currently prevailing migration models. Instead, the author uses social theories on the spread of innovations, the development and functioning of communication networks and the social technologies involved in the production of material culture in his arguments. For the first time, settlements from various regions of Europe are studied at the same level and compared using modern research methods such as aoristic frequency distributions, the Bayesian modelling of radiocarbon dates and network analyses. Temporal and spatial variability in the regional processes that lead to the adoption (and rejection!) of Bell Beaker innovations are described in detail. The regional variability in communication between settlements, and the exchange of ideas and objects and mobility of people are combined with sociological network theories on the spread and adoption of novel ideas. Regional differences in the production of pottery are reviewed by both quantitative and qualitative methods. Finally, a Bell Beaker network is described in which various processes of innovation adoption and subsequent re-invention, developing communication networks and different forms of mobility take part.
Preface by the editors 5(6)
Preface by author 11(2)
1 Setting the scene
13(14)
1.1 A recurring picture: The Beaker People
13(1)
1.2 Migrant? Smith? Stranger? King? Enemy? Friend?
13(2)
1.3 A Brief History of Beakers
15(2)
1.4 Migrations: burials are the basis
17(1)
1.5 What we should be studying
18(3)
1.6 Frameworks and source criticism
21(3)
1.6.1 Bell Beakers
21(1)
1.6.2 Bell Beakers contextually
21(1)
1.6.3 Bell Beakers spatially
21(2)
1.6.4 Bell Beaker chronologically
23(1)
1.7 Innovation and the Bell Beaker phenomenon
24(1)
1.8 Overview
24(3)
2 Theory and methodology
27(16)
2.1 Introduction
27(1)
2.2 Innovation processes
27(5)
2.2.1 The S-curve
28(1)
2.2.2 Stages of innovation
29(1)
2.2.3 Processes of innovation in archaeology
30(1)
2.2.3.1 Waves of advance
30(1)
2.2.3.2 Availability models
30(2)
2.3 The social landscape of innovation: networks and mechanisms
32(6)
2.3.1 The social landscape of innovation in archaeology
33(1)
2.3.1.1 Distribution maps
33(4)
2.3.1.2 Networks
37(1)
2.4 From innovation processes and social landscapes to practices
38(5)
2.4.1 Making innovation happen: pottery
39(4)
3 Methods
43(18)
3.1 Introduction
43(1)
3.2 Processes of innovation
43(4)
3.2.1 Pottery frequencies
43(2)
3.2.2 Settlement frequencies
45(1)
3.2.3 Bayesian analysis of settlement chronologies
46(1)
3.3 Social landscapes of innovation
47(9)
3.3.1 Introduction
47(1)
3.3.2 Network analysis
48(1)
3.3.2.1 Statistical methods
48(1)
3.3.2.2 Dataset
49(7)
3.4 Practices of innovation
56(3)
3.4.1 Introduction
56(1)
3.4.2 Changing forming traditions
57(2)
3.4.3 Skill and creativity
59(1)
3.4.3.1 Skill
59(1)
3.4.3.2 Creativity
59(1)
3.5 A note on settlement sites
59(1)
3.6 Conclusion
60(1)
4 Sources and limitations: settlements and radiocarbon dates
61(6)
4.1 Sources
61(1)
4.2 Radiocarbon 14C dates
62(2)
4.3 Limitations
64(3)
5 Analysis: Innovation processes
67(36)
5.1 Introduction
67(1)
5.2 Pottery frequencies: an overview
67(8)
5.2.1 Introduction
67(1)
5.2.2 Results
68(3)
5.2.3 Recapitulation
71(4)
5.3 Pottery frequencies: time and chronology
75(7)
5.3.1 Introduction
75(1)
5.3.2 Results
75(6)
5.3.3 Recapitulation
81(1)
5.4 Pottery frequencies: sites
82(3)
5.4.1 Introduction
82(1)
5.4.2 Results
82(3)
5.4.3 Recapitulation
85(1)
5.5 Bayesian modelling of settlements
85(14)
5.5.1 Introduction
85(1)
5.5.2 Results
86(11)
5.5.3 Bayesian analysis: intervals and spans
97(2)
5.6 Innovation and time: conclusion
99(4)
6 Analysis: Social landscapes of innovation
103(50)
6.1 Introduction
103(1)
6.2 Innovation mechanisms: networks
104(28)
6.2.1 Introduction
104(2)
6.2.2 Overview of the settlement data
106(1)
6.2.2.1 Pottery
106(2)
6.2.2.2 Stone and flint
108(3)
6.2.2.3 Metal
111(2)
6.2.2.4 Subsistence
113(2)
6.2.3 A reconstruction of communication networks
115(1)
6.2.3.1 A Bell Beaker pottery network
116(2)
6.2.3.2 A combined network
118(1)
6.2.3.3 Networks per region and chronology
119(10)
6.2.4 Innovation and networks: discussion
129(3)
6.3 Innovation mechanisms: movement
132(17)
6.3.1 Exchange of pottery
132(2)
6.3.2 Exchange of ideas
134(1)
6.3.2.1 Introduction
134(1)
6.3.2.2 Pendants and plates
134(4)
6.3.2.3 Palmela points
138(3)
6.3.3 Mobility of people
141(1)
6.3.3.1 Introduction
141(1)
6.3.3.2 Ancient DNA analysis
142(4)
6.3.3.3 Isotope analysis
146(1)
6.3.3.4 Migration interpretations: towards a mobility perspective
147(2)
6.4 Conclusion
149(4)
7 Analysis: Innovation and tradition in pottery production
153(30)
7.1 Introduction
153(1)
7.2 Changing habits
153(16)
7.2.1 Introduction
153(1)
7.2.2 Dataset
154(1)
7.2.3 Typological characterisation
155(3)
7.2.4 Vessel contexts
158(3)
7.2.5 Vessel shapes, typology and chronology
161(4)
7.2.6 Vessel typology and technology
165(1)
7.2.7 Innovation and pottery shape: discussion
166(3)
7.3 Changing choices
169(11)
7.3.1 Introduction
169(1)
7.3.2 The potter's choices, or: what can we study?
170(1)
7.3.3 Pottery assemblages
171(1)
7.3.3.1 Introduction
171(1)
7.3.3.2 Molenaarsgraaf
172(1)
7.3.3.3 Oostwoud Tuithoorn
172(1)
7.3.3.4 Velsen Waterland
172(1)
7.3.3.5 Deventer Skibaan
173(1)
7.3.3.6 Rhenen N225
173(1)
7.3.3.7 Haarlem Schoterweg
174(1)
7.3.3.8 Donk NEO 5
174(1)
7.3.3.9 Suttorf 18
174(1)
7.3.3.10 Lanz 14
175(1)
7.3.3.11 Gaasemoosen
175(1)
7.3.3.12 Tastum
176(1)
7.3.3.13 Holubice I
176(1)
7.3.3.14 Ceska I
176(1)
7.3.3.15 Tesetice III
177(1)
7.3.3.16 Kelcice I
177(1)
7.3.4 Analysis of skills and creativity
177(1)
7.3.4.1 Introduction
177(1)
7.3.4.2 Skill
178(1)
7.3.4.3 Creativity
179(1)
7.4 Conclusion
180(3)
8 Discussion and conclusion
183(12)
8.1 Introduction
183(1)
8.2 Bell Beaker adoption per research area
183(7)
8.2.1 Lower Rhine Area
183(1)
8.2.2 Northern France
184(1)
8.2.3 Western France
185(1)
8.2.4 Portuguese Estremadura
186(1)
8.2.5 Czech Republic
187(1)
8.2.6 Southern Scandinavia 8t Northern Germany
188(2)
8.3 General trends in adopting Bell Beaker innovations
190(1)
8.4 Methodological observations
191(2)
8.5 Why adopt?
193(1)
8.6 Conclusion
194(1)
Bibliography 195(66)
Appendix A 261(2)
Appendix B 263(6)
Appendix C 269(2)
Appendix D 271(2)
Appendix E 273(2)
Appendix F 275(4)
Summary 279(6)
Zusammenfassung 285(10)
Acknowledgements 295(2)
Curriculum Vitae 297(2)
Tabular Curriculum Vitae 299