Kriso.lv interneta veikals karantīnas laikā darbību nepārtrauc, pasūtījumi tiek pieņemti visu diennakti. Arī pasūtījumu piegāde notiek kā parasti – ar Omniva kurjerdienesta starpniecību.

Industrial Biomimetics [Hardback]

  • Formāts: Hardback, 294 pages, height x width: 229x152 mm, weight: 612 g, 8 Tables, black and white; 7 Illustrations, color; 144 Illustrations, black and white
  • Izdošanas datums: 10-Jun-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Pan Stanford Publishing Pte Ltd
  • ISBN-10: 9814800074
  • ISBN-13: 9789814800075
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
  • Hardback
  • Cena: 188,98 €
  • Pievienot vēlmju sarakstam
  • Grāmatu piegādes laiks ir 3-4 nedēļas, ja grāmata ir uz vietas izdevniecības noliktavā. Ja izdevējam nepieciešams publicēt jaunu tirāžu, grāmatas piegāde var aizkavēties.
  • Ielikt grozā
  • Daudzums:
  • Piegādes laiks - 4-6 nedēļas
  • Bibliotēkām
  • Formāts: Hardback, 294 pages, height x width: 229x152 mm, weight: 612 g, 8 Tables, black and white; 7 Illustrations, color; 144 Illustrations, black and white
  • Izdošanas datums: 10-Jun-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Pan Stanford Publishing Pte Ltd
  • ISBN-10: 9814800074
  • ISBN-13: 9789814800075
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
Biomimetics is an innovative paradigm shift based on biodiversity for sustainability. Biodiversity is not only the result of evolutionary adaption but also the optimized solution of an epic combinatorial chemistry for sustainability, because the diversity has been acquired by biological processes and technology, including production processes, operating principles, and control systems, all of which differ from human technology. In the recent decades, biomimetics has gained a great deal of industrial interest because of its unique solutions for engineering problems. In this book, researchers have contributed cutting-edge results from the viewpoint of two types of industrial applications of biomimetics. The first type starts with engineering tasks to solve an engineering problem using biomimetics, while the other starts with the knowledge of biology and its application to engineering fields. This book discusses both approaches. Edited by Profs. Masatsugu Shimomura and Akihiro Miyauchi, two prominent nanotechnology researchers, this book will appeal to advanced undergraduate- and graduate-level students of biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering and to researchers working in the areas of mechanics, optical devices, glue materials, sensor devices, and SEM observation of living matter.
Preface xiii
1 3D Modeling of Shark Skin and Prototype Diffuser for Fluid Control 1(14)
Akihiro Miyauchi
1.1 Analysis of Shark Skin
1(3)
1.2 Biomimetic Design of Shark Skin
4(4)
1.3 Evaluation of Biomimetic Design
8(3)
1.4 Summary
11(4)
2 Friction Control Surfaces in Nature: Analysis of Firebrat Scales 15(14)
Yuji Hirai
Naoto Okuda
Masatsugu Shimomura
2.1 Nature Friction Control Surface
15(2)
2.2 Firebrat Scale Surface Observations
17(3)
2.3 Friction Property of Firebrat Scales
20(4)
2.4 Summary
24(5)
3 Biomechanics and Biomimetics in Flying and Swimming 29(52)
Hao Liu
Toshiyuki Nakata
Gen Li
Dmitry Kolomenskiy
3.1 Introduction
30(2)
3.2 Unsteady Biomechanical Mechanisms in Flapping Flight
32(15)
3.2.1 Leading-Edge Vortices of Flapping and Revolving Wings
32(4)
3.2.2 Passive Mechanisms in Flexible Wings and Hinges
36(5)
3.2.3 Dynamics of Animal Flight in Turbulence
41(4)
3.2.4 Biomimetics in Bioinspired Flight Systems
45(2)
3.2.4.1 Overview on flapping micro-air vehicles
45(2)
3.3 Unsteady Biomechanical Mechanisms in Swimming
47(14)
3.3.1 Unsteady Hydrodynamics in Cyclic Swimming
47(5)
3.3.1.1 Flapping-fin hydrodynamics
48(1)
3.3.1.2 Undulatory swimming
49(2)
3.3.1.3 Interaction between body and fins
51(1)
3.3.2 Hydrodynamics in C-Start and Maneuvering
52(2)
3.3.3 Swimming Hydrodynamics in Unsteady Environments
54(3)
3.3.3.1 Swimming in turbulence
54(1)
3.3.3.2 Collective swimming
55(2)
3.3.4 Biomimetics in Bioinspired Swimming Systems
57(24)
3.3.4.1 Fish robots
58(1)
3.3.4.2 Control
59(1)
3.3.4.3 Development for actuators
59(2)
3.4 Conclusion and Perspectives
61(20)
4 Shape-Tunable Wrinkles Can Switch Frictional Properties 81(32)
Takuya Ohzono
Kosuke Suzuki
4.1 Introduction
81(5)
4.1.1 Friction at Soft Structured Interfaces
81(2)
4.1.2 Shape-Tunable Wrinkles
83(3)
4.2 Friction on Wrinkled Surfaces
86(19)
4.2.1 Friction Force Measurements
88(1)
4.2.2 Preparation of Polyimide Wrinkles
88(1)
4.2.3 Friction with a Small Indenter on Polyimide Wrinkles
89(5)
4.2.4 Friction with a Large Indenter on Polyimide Wrinkles
94(1)
4.2.5 Preparation of Porous-Film- Embedded Wrinkles
95(4)
4.2.6 Friction with a Large Indenter on Porous-Film-Embedded Wrinkles
99(2)
4.2.7 Preparation of Textile-Sheet- Embedded Wrinkles
101(2)
4.2.8 Friction with a Large Indenter on Textile-Sheet-Embedded Wrinkles
103(2)
4.3 Summary
105(8)
5 Self-Lubricating Gels: SLUGs 113(12)
Atsushi Hozumi
Chihiro Urata
Tomoya Sato
Liming Wang
Matt W England
5.1 Introduction
114(1)
5.2 Sample Preparation
114(4)
5.3 Applications of SLUGs
118(4)
5.3.1 Liquid Repellency
118(1)
5.3.2 Spontaneous Formation/Regeneration of Superhydrophobicity
119(2)
5.3.3 Anti-icing/Snow Properties
121(1)
5.4 Summary
122(3)
6 Bioinspired Materials for Thermal Management Applications 125(14)
Hirotaka Maeda
6.1 Introduction
125(1)
6.2 Saharan Silver Ants
126(3)
6.3 Morpho Butterfly
129(3)
6.4 Diatom Frustule
132(4)
6.5 Summary
136(3)
7 Strange Wing Folding in a Rove Beetle 139(16)
Kazuya Saito
7.1 Introduction
139(3)
7.2 Wing Folding in Beetles
142(4)
7.2.1 Crease Patterns
142(1)
7.2.2 Mechanisms
143(3)
7.2.2.1 Wing elasticity
143(1)
7.2.2.2 Muscle
143(2)
7.2.2.3 Other body parts
145(1)
7.3 Wing Folding in a Rove Beetle
146(7)
7.3.1 What Is a Rove Beetle?
146(1)
7.3.2 Wing-Folding Process in Rove Beetles
147(3)
7.3.3 From Right or Left?
150(3)
7.4 Conclusion
153(2)
8 Biotemplating Process for Electromagnetic Materials 155(20)
Kaori Kamata
8.1 Introduction
155(1)
8.2 Electromagnetic Materials Utilizing Biomaterials
156(3)
8.3 Application of the Biotemplate Process for the Fabrication of Electromagnetic Microcoils
159(5)
8.3.1 Electromagnetic Induction Properties of a Microcoil
161(1)
8.3.2 Electromagnetic Properties of Lotus-Based Metallic Microcoils
162(2)
8.4 Structure Control of a Metallic Microcoil via the Biotemplating Process and the Electromagnetic Characteristics
164(6)
8.4.1 Tissue Fixation of the Spiral Biotemplate
166(1)
8.4.2 Biotemplate Process Using the Fixed Spirulina
167(1)
8.4.3 Electromagnetic Property of a Spirulina-Templated Microcoil
168(2)
8.5 Conclusion
170(5)
9 Application of Structural Color 175(8)
Haruko Hirose
9.1 Structural Color
175(1)
9.2 Structure of the Morpho Butterfly Wing
176(1)
9.3 Mechanisms of Structural Color
177(1)
9.4 Development of the Structural Color Fiber "MORPHOTEX®"
178(2)
9.5 Development of the Light Interference Film "Multilayer Film"
180(3)
10 Moth Eye-Type Antireflection Films 183(12)
Yoshihiro Uozu
10.1 Introduction
183(1)
10.2 Review of Reflection-Reducing Films
184(1)
10.3 Moth Eye Surface
184(2)
10.3.1 Natural Moth Eye Surface
184(2)
10.3.2 Artificial Moth Eye Surface
186(1)
10.4 Production Process of the Moth Eye Antireflection Film
186(4)
10.4.1 Conventional Process
186(1)
10.4.2 Anodic Porous Alumina
186(1)
10.4.3 Large Moth Eye Mold
187(1)
10.4.4 Photonanoimprinting of the Moth Eye Structure
188(1)
10.4.5 Continuous Photonanoimprinting of the Moth Eye Structure
189(1)
10.5 Characteristics of the Moth Eye Antireflection Film
190(3)
10.5.1 Antireflection
190(2)
10.5.2 Water Repellent
192(1)
10.6 Conclusion
193(2)
11 Transparent Superhydrophobic Film Created through Biomimetics of Lotus Leaf and Moth Eye Structures 195(18)
Nobuyuki ltoh
11.1 Introduction
196(2)
11.2 Optical Properties of a Transparent Superhydrophobic Film
198(4)
11.3 Study of Transparent Superhydrophobic Film Using a Moth Eye Nanostructure and Deposition of Fluorine Materials
202(7)
11.4 Summary
209(4)
12 Adhesion under Wet Conditions Inspired by Marine Sessile Organisms 213(16)
Motoyasu Kobayashi
12.1 Introduction
214(1)
12.2 Mussel-Inspired Adhesives
215(7)
12.3 Tunicate-Inspired Adhesives
222(1)
12.4 Barnacle-Inspired Adhesives
222(2)
12.5 Summary
224(5)
13 Functional Analysis of the Mechanical Design of the Cricket's Wind Receptor Hair 229(28)
Tateo Shimozawa
13.1 Introduction
230(1)
13.2 Measurement of Mobility of the Hair Due To Air Motion
231(6)
13.3 Mechanical Model of the Wind Receptor Hair
237(3)
13.4 Stokes's Mechanical Impedance of an Oscillating Cylinder in a Viscous Fluid
240(1)
13.5 Boundary Layer
241(2)
13.6 Torque Calculation
243(1)
13.7 The Shape of the Wind Receptor Hair
244(2)
13.8 Allometric Scaling of Biological Design
246(2)
13.9 Impedance Matching
248(1)
13.10 Energy Available to the Sensory Cell
249(2)
13.11 Conclusions, with Biological Insight into Engineering
251(6)
14 Echolocation of Bats and Dolphins and Its Application 257(16)
Ikuo Matsuo
14.1 Introduction
257(1)
14.2 Biomimetic Model of a Bat's Echolocation
258(5)
14.2.1 Time-Frequency Analysis Mimicking the Auditory Peripheral System
259(1)
14.2.2 Model for Localization of Objects
260(1)
14.2.3 Localization of the Static Object
261(1)
14.2.4 Localization of the Moving Object
262(1)
14.3 Echo Sounder System Using a Dolphin-Like Sound
263(4)
14.3.1 Echoes from Fish
264(1)
14.3.2 Tracking Individual Fish Using the Split-Beam System
264(3)
14.3.3 Application in a Fish School
267(1)
14.4 Summary
267(6)
15 The "NanoSuit®" Preserves Wet/Living Organisms for Observation in High Resolution under a Scanning Electron Microscope 273(12)
Takahiko Hariyama
15.1 Introduction
274(1)
15.2 Finding of the NanoSuit®
275(3)
15.2.1 High-Vacuum-Tolerant Animals: Polymerization of NanoSuit® Based on Natural Substances
275(1)
15.2.2 NanoSuit® Formation by Electron Beam and/or Plasma Irradiation
276(1)
15.2.3 Mimicking ECSs for Other Animals
277(1)
15.2.4 Transparency of the NanoSuit® for Observations
278(1)
15.3 The Biomimetic ECS Films Made by Other Chemical Compounds
278(1)
15.4 Tissues and Cells with NanoSuits®
279(2)
15.4.1 Tissues
279(1)
15.4.2 Cells
280(1)
15.5 Discussion
281(4)
Index 285
Akihiro Miyauchi is a nanotechnology researcher currently working as professor at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan. He received his bachelor's in theoretical physics from the Tokyo University of Science and his master's and PhD from the Tokyo Institute of Technology. He was a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1995-1996 and chief researcher at Hitachi Ltd. for 10 years, where he led four national projects on nanoimprinting and biomimetics. Prof. Miyauchi is session chair of the International Microprocesses and Nanotechnology Conference and a member of the International Conference on Nanoimprint and has been an expert advisor for the Ministry of Education and New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), Japan. He has developed high-speed integrated circuits for optical communication using selective CVD, cell cultivation plates for regenerative medical, fluid control machines, and fuel cells. His current research involves biomimetics for fluid control and antibiofouling using informatics. Masatsugu Shimomura graduated from Kyushu University, Japan, after which he worked as assistant professor in the field of biomimetic chemistry in Prof. Toyoki Kunitake's laboratory. He moved to the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan, as associate professor, where he researched polymeric Langmuir-Blodgett films. Then he moved to Hokkaido University, Japan, for starting a new laboratory to work on bottom-up nanotechnology based on self-organization and biomimetics. Concurrently, he held the post of principle investigator at RIKEN, Japan, where he developed self-organized honeycomb-patterned polymer films in collaboration with many industrial companies. After moving to Tohoku University, Japan, Prof. Shimomura organized a national research project on engineering neobiomimetics and started an educational program on biomimetics at the Chitose Institute of Science and Technology, Japan. He has also worked with Prof. Helmut Ringsdorf of the University of Mainz, Germany, and Prof. Erich Sackmann of TU-Munich, Germany.