International Law of the Sea 3rd Revised edition [Hardback]

(University of Copenhagen)
  • Formāts: Hardback, 634 pages, height x width x depth: 253x178x33 mm, weight: 1400 g, 14 Tables, black and white; 13 Line drawings, black and white
  • Izdošanas datums: 15-Aug-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 110842421X
  • ISBN-13: 9781108424219
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  • Cena: 116,28 €
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  • Formāts: Hardback, 634 pages, height x width x depth: 253x178x33 mm, weight: 1400 g, 14 Tables, black and white; 13 Line drawings, black and white
  • Izdošanas datums: 15-Aug-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 110842421X
  • ISBN-13: 9781108424219
This new edition has been fully revised to include up-to-date coverage of essential issues of the international law of the sea. Covering a number of new and important issues, such as the headline debate of migrant movement across the seas, and the definition of islands in light of the South China Sea Arbitration, it also includes chapters on conservation of marine living resources and biological diversity, protection of the marine environment, and international peace and security at sea, as well as building further on such topics as the impact of climate change on the oceans. A precise and readable book, with many figures and tables, The International Law of the Sea continues to be the best choice for students wanting to understand the law of the sea.

Recenzijas

'This book offers a clear and concise account of the key rules and principles which underpin the modern law of the sea, and will provide an excellent starting point for anyone wishing to get an up-to-date overview of this fascinating subject.' James Harrison, University of Edinburgh 'This 'classical' handbook of the international law of the sea confirms that it is possible to elaborate in a clear style and with coherent logic on a complex legal picture.' Tullio Scovazzi, University of Milano, Bicocca 'One of the very few books on international law of the sea that is accessible for students and covers all necessary foundational areas as well as current global issues.' Anna-Mari Antoniou, University of Essex 'Thoroughly updated in light of all the latest significant case-law and treaty developments, this is an essential textbook for students and indispensable reference point for those in the practice.' Alexandros Ntovas, University of Southampton 'This book offers a clear and concise account of the key rules and principles which underpin the modern law of the sea, and will provide an excellent starting point for anyone wishing to get an up-to-date overview of this fascinating subject.' James Harrison, University of Edinburgh 'This 'classical' handbook of the international law of the sea confirms that it is possible to elaborate in a clear style and with coherent logic on a complex legal picture.' Tullio Scovazzi, University of Milano, Bicocca 'One of the very few books on international law of the sea that is accessible for students and covers all necessary foundational areas as well as current global issues.' Anna-Mari Antoniou, University of Essex 'Thoroughly updated in light of all the latest significant case-law and treaty developments, this is an essential textbook for students and indispensable reference point for those in the practice.' Alexandros Ntovas, University of Southampton

Papildus informācija

Provides comprehensive coverage of basic and contemporary issues of the law of the sea in a systematic manner.
Preface xvii
List of Figures xix
List of Tables xx
List of Abbreviations xxi
Table of Cases xxiv
Table of Treaties and Instruments xxx
Part I The Divided Oceans: International Law Governing Jurisdictional Zones 1(278)
1 The Law of the Sea in Perspective
3(50)
1 Introduction
3(4)
1.1 General Considerations
3(1)
1.2 Functions of the Law of the Sea
4(1)
1.3 Two Paradigms in the Law of the Sea
5(2)
2 Marine Spaces in the Law of the Sea
7(4)
2.1 Scope of the Oceans in the Law of the Sea
7(1)
2.2 Typology of Marine Spaces
7(4)
3 Sources of the International Law of the Sea
11(11)
3.1 Formal Sources
11(7)
3.2 Material Sources
18(4)
4 Principles of the International Law of the Sea
22(4)
4.1 Principle of Freedom
22(2)
4.2 Principle of Sovereignty
24(1)
4.3 Principle of the Common Heritage of Mankind
25(1)
5 The Codification of the Law of the Sea
26(11)
5.1 The Hague Conference for the Codification of International Law (1930)
26(2)
5.2 The First UN Conference on the Law of the Sea (1958)
28(3)
5.3 The Second UN Conference on the Law of the Sea (1960)
31(1)
5.4 The Third UN Conference on the Law of the Sea (1973-1982)
32(5)
6 Outline of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea
37(3)
6.1 General Considerations
37(1)
6.2 Principal Features of the Convention
38(2)
7 Development After UNCLOS III
40(6)
7.1 General Considerations
40(1)
7.2 Adoption of two Implementation Agreements
41(1)
7.3 De facto Amendment of the LOSC Through Meetings of States Parties
41(2)
7.4 Development of the Law of the Sea Through International Organisations
43(3)
8 Conclusions
46(7)
2 Baselines and Related Issues
53(41)
1 Introduction
53(1)
2 Baselines
54(20)
2.1 Normal Baselines
54(2)
2.2 Straight Baselines
56(7)
2.3 Juridical Bays
63(4)
2.4 Historic Bays
67(4)
2.5 Bays Bordered By More Than One State
71(1)
2.6 River Mouths
72(1)
2.7 Ports
73(1)
3 Islands
74(13)
3.1 Nature of the Problem
74(1)
3.2 Definition of an Island
75(2)
3.3 Rocks for the Purposes of Article 121(3)
77(7)
3.4 Customary Law Nature of Article 121
84(1)
3.5 Reefs
85(2)
4 Low-Tide Elevations
87(3)
4.1 Identification of Low-Tide Elevations
87(1)
4.2 Case Law Concerning Low-Tide Elevations
88(2)
5 Conclusions
90(4)
3 Marine Spaces Under National Jurisdiction I: Territorial Sovereignty
94(51)
1 Introduction
94(1)
2 Internal Waters
95(7)
2.1 Spatial Scope of Internal Waters
95(1)
2.2 Legal Status of Internal Waters
96(1)
2.3 Jurisdiction of the Coastal State over Foreign Vessels in Internal Waters
96(2)
2.4 Access to Ports
98(1)
2.5 Ships in Distress at Sea
99(3)
3 Territorial Sea
102(14)
3.1 Legal Status of the Territorial Sea
102(2)
3.2 The Right of Innocent Passage
104(4)
3.3 The Right of Innocent Passage of Warships
108(3)
3.4 The Right of Innocent Passage of Foreign Nuclear-Powered Ships and Ships Carrying Inherently Dangerous or Noxious Substances
111(2)
3.5 The Rights of the Coastal State Concerning Innocent Passage
113(3)
3.6 The Obligations of the coastal State Concerning Innocent Passage
116(1)
4 International Straits
116(15)
4.1 Legal Framework for International Straits Prior to 1982
116(1)
4.2 Typology of International Straits Under the LOSC
117(1)
4.3 International Straits Under Part III of the LOSC
117(5)
4.4 International Straits Outside the Scope of Part III of the LOSC
122(1)
4.5 The Right of Transit Passage
123(3)
4.6 Rights and Obligations of Coastal States Bordering Straits
126(3)
4.7 Customary Law Character of the Right of Transit Passage
129(1)
4.8 Non-suspendable Innocent Passage
129(1)
4.9 Legality of Creation of Bridges in International Straits
130(1)
5 Archipelagic Waters
131(9)
5.1 General Considerations
131(1)
5.2 Definition of an Archipelago, Archipelagic States and Archipelagic Waters
131(2)
5.3 Archipelagic Baselines
133(3)
5.4 Jurisdiction of Archipelagic States Over Archipelagic Waters
136(1)
5.5 The Right of Innocent Passage Through Archipelagic Waters
137(1)
5.6 The Right of Archipelagic Sea Lanes Passage
138(2)
5.7 Rights and Obligations of an Archipelagic State
140(1)
6 Conclusions
140(5)
4 Marine Spaces Under National Jurisdiction II: Sovereign Rights
145(41)
1 Introduction
145(1)
2 Contiguous Zone
146(3)
2.1 The Concept of the Contiguous Zone
146(1)
2.2 Coastal State Jurisdiction Over the Contiguous Zone
147(2)
3 Exclusive Economic Zone
149(12)
3.1 Genesis of the Concept of the EEZ
149(2)
3.2 Legal Status of the EEZ
151(2)
3.3 Sovereign Rights Over the EEZ
153(2)
3.4 Jurisdiction of Coastal States Over the EEZ
155(3)
3.5 Freedoms of Third States
158(1)
3.6 Residual Rights
159(1)
3.7 Historic Rights and the EEZ
160(1)
4 Continental Shelf
161(21)
4.1 Genesis of the Concept of the Continental Shelf
161(1)
4.2 Spatial Scope of the Continental Shelf
162(2)
4.3 Criteria for Determining the Outer Limits of the Continental Shelf Beyond 200 Nautical Miles
164(3)
4.4 The Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf
167(1)
4.5 Procedures to Establish the Outer Limits of the Continental Shelf
168(3)
4.6 Payments Concerning the Exploitation of the Continental Shelf Beyond 200 Nautical Miles
171(1)
4.7 The Sovereign Rights of the Coastal State Over the Continental Shelf
172(2)
4.8 Freedoms of Third States
174(3)
4.9 Protection of Archaeological and Historical Objects Found Within the Continental Shelf
177(5)
5 Conclusions
182(4)
5 Marine Spaces Beyond National Jurisdiction
186(50)
1 Introduction
186(1)
2 The High Seas
187(29)
2.1 Spatial Scope of the High Seas
187(1)
2.2 Principle of the Freedom of the High Seas
187(2)
2.3 Principle of the Exclusive Jurisdiction of the Flag State
189(4)
2.4 The Nationality of a Ship
193(2)
2.5 Problems Associated With Flags of Convenience
195(3)
2.6 Exceptions to the Exclusive Jurisdiction of the Flag State (1): The Right of Visit
198(4)
2.7 Exceptions to the Exclusive Jurisdiction of the Flag State (2): The Right of Hot Pursuit
202(5)
2.8 Exceptional Measures for Interception of Foreign Vessels on the High Seas
207(3)
2.9 Regulation of Migrant Smuggling by Sea
210(6)
3 The Area
216(16)
3.1 General Considerations
216(1)
3.2 Spatial Scope of the Area
217(1)
3.3 Raison d'etre of the Principle of the Common Heritage of Mankind
217(2)
3.4 Elements of the Principle of the Common Heritage of Mankind
219(1)
3.5 International Seabed Authority
220(4)
3.6 System for the Exploration and Exploitation of Resources of the Area
224(1)
3.7 Obligations and Liability of Sponsoring States
225(2)
3.8 The 1994 Implementation Agreement
227(5)
4 Conclusions
232(4)
6 Maritime Delimitation
236(43)
1 Introduction
236(1)
2 Concept of Maritime Delimitation
237(1)
2.1 Definition
237(1)
2.2 Typology of Maritime Delimitation
238(1)
3 Treaty Law Concerning Maritime Delimitation
238(4)
3.1 The 1958 Geneva Conventions
238(2)
3.2 The 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea
240(2)
4 Development of Case Law Relating to Maritime Delimitation: Two Contrasting Approaches
242(8)
4.1 The First Phase (1969-1992)
242(2)
4.2 The Second Phase (1993-2007)
244(3)
4.3 The Third Phase (2009-present)
247(1)
4.4 Commentary
247(3)
5 Consideration of Relevant Circumstances (1): Geographical Factors
250(13)
5.1 Configuration of Coasts
251(1)
5.2 Proportionality
252(4)
5.3 Baselines
256(2)
5.4 Presence of Islands
258(3)
5.5 Geological and Geomorphological Factors
261(1)
5.6 Presence of Third States
261(2)
6 Consideration of Relevant Circumstances (2): Non-geographical Factors
263(4)
6.1 Economic Factors
263(2)
6.2 Conduct of the Parties
265(1)
6.3 Historic Title and Historic Rights
266(1)
6.4 Security Interests
266(1)
6.5 Navigational Factors
267(1)
6.6 Environmental Factors
267(1)
7 An Evaluation
267(5)
7.1 General Trend of Case Law
267(1)
7.2 Judicial Creativity in the Law of Maritime Delimitation
268(1)
7.3 Delimitation of the Continental Shelf Beyond 200 Nautical Miles
269(3)
8 Provisional Arrangements
272(3)
8.1 Articles 74(3) and 83(3) of the LOSC
272(2)
8.2 Unilateral Exploration and Exploitation of Natural Resources in Disputed Areas
274(1)
9 Conclusions
275(4)
Part II Our Common Ocean: Protection Of Community Interests At Sea 279(265)
7 Conservation of Marine Living Resources
281(41)
1 Introduction
281(2)
2 Conservation of Marine Living Resources Prior to 1982
283(1)
3 Conservation of Marine Living Resources Under the LOSC (1): The Zonal Management Approach
284(5)
3.1 General Considerations
284(1)
3.2 Conservation of Marine Living Resources in the EEZ
285(2)
3.3 Conservation of Marine Living Resources in the High Seas
287(1)
3.4 Limits of the Zonal Management Approach
288(1)
4 Conservation of Marine Living Resources Under the LOSC (2): The Species-specific Approach
289(12)
4.1 Shared and Straddling Fish Stocks
289(2)
4.2 Highly Migratory Species
291(1)
4.3 Marine Mammals
291(7)
4.4 Anadromous Stocks
298(1)
4.5 Catadromous Species
299(1)
4.6 Limits of the Species-Specific Approach
300(1)
5 Development After the LOSC
301(9)
5.1 The Concept of Sustainable Development
301(2)
5.2 The Ecosystem Approach
303(3)
5.3 The Precautionary Approach
306(4)
6 Ensuring Compliance
310(9)
6.1 Flag State Responsibility and Its Limits
310(3)
6.2 At-sea Inspection of Contracting Party Vessels
313(1)
6.3 At-sea Inspection of Non-Contracting Party Vessels
314(2)
6.4 Port Inspection of Contracting Party Vessels
316(1)
6.5 Port Inspection of non-Contracting Party Vessels
317(2)
7 Conclusions
319(3)
8 Protection of the Marine Environment
322(82)
1 Introduction
322(2)
2 Typology of Marine Pollution
324(5)
2.1 General Considerations
324(1)
2.2 Land-based Marine Pollution
325(1)
2.3 Vessel-source Marine Pollution
326(1)
2.4 Dumping at Sea
327(2)
2.5 Pollution from Seabed Activities
329(1)
3 Legal Framework for Marine Environmental Protection Prior to 198
329(3)
3.1 Customary Law
329(2)
3.2 Treaty Law
331(1)
4 Protection of the Marine Environment in the LOSC
332(4)
4.1 Generality and Comprehensiveness
332(1)
4.2 Uniformity of Rules
333(2)
4.3 Obligation to Cooperate in the Protection of the Marine Environment
335(1)
5 Regulation of Land-based Marine Pollution
336(12)
5.1 Limits of the Global Legal Framework
336(3)
5.2 Development of Regional Treaties
339(1)
5.3 Identification of Harmful Substances
339(3)
5.4 Precautionary Approach
342(1)
5.5 Environmental Impact Assessment and Monitoring
342(2)
5.6 International Control
344(3)
5.7 Access to Information and Public Participation
347(1)
6 Regulation of Vessel-source Marine Pollution
348(25)
6.1 MARPOL
348(3)
6.2 The LOSC Regime (1): Regulation by Flag States
351(1)
6.3 The LOSC Regime (2): Regulation by Coastal States
352(3)
6.4 The LOSC Regime (3): Regulation by Port States
355(2)
6.5 Port State Control
357(2)
6.6 Intervention by Coastal States in the case of Pollution Casualties
359(2)
6.7 Pollution Emergencies at Sea
361(2)
6.8 Liability for Oil Pollution Damage
363(5)
6.9 Liability for Other Pollution Damage
368(2)
6.10 Issues of Special Concern: Invasive Alien Species and Ocean Noise
370(3)
7 Dumping at Sea
373(6)
7.1 Regulation of Dumping at Sea Under the LOSC
373(1)
7.2 The 1972 London Dumping Convention and the 1996 Protocol
374(2)
7.3 Regional Treaties
376(1)
7.4 Ocean Sequestration and Fertilisation
377(2)
8 Regulation of Pollution from Seabed Activities
379(4)
8.1 Marine Pollution Arising From Seabed Activities Under National Jurisdiction
379(2)
8.2 Marine Pollution Arising From Seabed Activities in the Area
381(2)
9 Environmental Protection of Ice-covered Areas
383(8)
9.1 Article 234 of the LOSC
383(2)
9.2 Environmental Protection of the Marine Arctic
385(6)
10 The Impacts of Climate Change on the Oceans
391(7)
10.1 The Reduction of GHG Emissions from Shipping
391(3)
10.2 Ocean Acidification
394(4)
11 Conclusions
398(6)
9 Conservation of Marine Biological Diversity
404(28)
1 Introduction
404(2)
2 Principal Approaches to Conservation of Marine Biological Diversity
406(3)
2.1 General Considerations
406(1)
2.2 Three Approaches
407(2)
3 Global Legal Frameworks for the Conservation of Marine Biological Diversity
409(9)
3.1 The 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea
409(4)
3.2 The 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity
413(5)
4 Marine Protected Areas
418(11)
4.1 General Considerations
418(1)
4.2 Typology of MPAs in International Law
419(4)
4.3 MPAs in the High Seas
423(5)
4.4 Limits of MPAs
428(1)
5 Conclusions
429(3)
10 Marine Scientific Research
432(19)
1 Introduction
432(1)
2 The Concept of Marine Scientific Research
433(3)
3 Regulation of Marine Scientific Research in the LOSC
436(6)
3.1 General Considerations
436(1)
3.2 Marine Scientific Research in Marine Spaces Under National Jurisdiction
437(2)
3.3 Marine Scientific Research in Marine Spaces Beyond National Jurisdiction
439(1)
3.4 Regulation of Scientific Research Installations
440(2)
4 Legality of Military and Hydrographic Surveys in the EEZ
442(2)
5 International Cooperation in Marine Scientific Research
444(1)
6 Transfer of Technology
445(3)
6.1 Transfer of Technology Under the LOSC
445(2)
6.2 IOC Criteria and Guidelines on the Transfer of Marine Technology
447(1)
7 Conclusions
448(3)
11 Maintenance of International Peace and Security at Sea
451(28)
1 Introduction
451(1)
2 The Suppression of Piracy
452(11)
2.1 Concept of Piracy
452(4)
2.2 Seizure of Pirates
456(4)
2.3 The Role of the UN Security Council in Counter-piracy Operations
460(1)
2.4 The Use of Privately Contracted Armed Security Personnel
461(2)
3 Regulation of Unlawful Offences and Weapons of Mass Destruction at Sea
463(6)
3.1 The 2005 SUA Convention
463(4)
3.2 Proliferation Security Initiative
467(1)
3.3 UN Interceptions at Sea
468(1)
4 Military Exercises in the EEZ
469(3)
5 Regulation of Nuclear Weapons at Sea
472(4)
6 Conclusions
476(3)
12 Land-Locked and Geographically Disadvantaged States
479(14)
1 Introduction
479(3)
2 Land-Locked States and Access to the Sea
482(4)
2.1 Legal Regime Prior to the LOSC
482(1)
2.2 Legal Regime of the LOSC
483(3)
3 The Navigational Rights of Land-Locked States
486(1)
4 Land-Locked and Geographically Disadvantaged States and Uses of the Oceans
486(5)
4.1 Fishing Rights
486(3)
4.2 Exploitation of Non-living Resources in the Oceans
489(1)
4.3 Marine Scientific Research
490(1)
5 Conclusions
491(2)
13 Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes
493(45)
1 Introduction
493(1)
2 Basic Structure of Dispute Settlement Procedures in the LOSC
494(9)
2.1 General Considerations
494(2)
2.2 The Interlinkage Between Voluntary and Compulsory Procedures for Dispute Settlement
496(5)
2.3 Voluntary Conciliation
501(2)
3 Compulsory Procedures for Dispute Settlement
503(7)
3.1 Multiplicity of Forums
503(3)
3.2 Limitations to the Compulsory Procedures
506(1)
3.3 Optional Exceptions to the Compulsory Procedures
507(3)
4 The International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (1): Organisation
510(4)
4.1 Members of ITLOS
510(2)
4.2 The Seabed Disputes Chamber
512(1)
4.3 Special Chambers
513(1)
5 The International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (2): Procedure
514(20)
5.1 Jurisdiction of ITLOS
514(1)
5.2 Applicable Law
515(1)
5.3 Proceedings Before ITLOS
516(1)
5.4 Incidental Proceedings
517(9)
5.5 Judgment
526(1)
5.6 Advisory Proceedings
527(3)
5.7 Prompt Release Procedure
530(4)
6 Conclusions
534(4)
14 Looking Ahead
538(6)
1 Limitations of the Traditional Framework in the Law of the Sea
538(2)
2 Towards Protection of Community Interests at Sea: Four Models
540(4)
Index 544
Yoshifumi Tanaka is Professor of International Law with Specific Focus on the Law of the Sea at the Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen. He is the single author of five books: Predictability and Flexibility in the Law of Maritime Delimitation (2006; 2nd edition, 2019), A Dual Approach to Ocean Governance (2008), The International Law of the Sea (2012; 2nd edition, 2015), The Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes (Cambridge, 2018), and The South China Sea Arbitration (2019). He has published widely in the fields of the law of the sea, international environmental law and peaceful settlement of international disputes.