Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure 4th Revised edition [Mīkstie vāki]

(University of Birmingham), (Universiteit van Amsterdam), (Queen's University, Ontario)
  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 640 pages, height x width x depth: 247x175x30 mm, weight: 1290 g, Worked examples or Exercises
  • Izdošanas datums: 15-Aug-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 1108741614
  • ISBN-13: 9781108741613
  • Mīkstie vāki
  • Cena: 55,70 €
  • Pievienot vēlmju sarakstam
  • Grāmatu piegādes laiks ir 3-4 nedēļas, ja grāmata ir uz vietas izdevniecības noliktavā. Ja izdevējam nepieciešams publicēt jaunu tirāžu, grāmatas piegāde var aizkavēties.
  • Ielikt grozā
  • Daudzums:
  • Piegādes laiks - 4-6 nedēļas
  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 640 pages, height x width x depth: 247x175x30 mm, weight: 1290 g, Worked examples or Exercises
  • Izdošanas datums: 15-Aug-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 1108741614
  • ISBN-13: 9781108741613
Written by a team of international lawyers with extensive academic and practical experience of international criminal law, the fourth edition of this leading textbook offers readers comprehensive coverage and a high level of academic rigour while maintaining its signature accessible and engaging style. Introducing the readers to the fundamental concepts of international criminal law, as well as the domestic and international institutions that enforce that law, this book engages with critical questions, political and moral challenges, and alternatives to international justice. Suitable for undergraduate and postgraduate students, academics and practitioners in the field, and cited by the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia, the International Criminal Court, the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, and the highest courts in domestic systems, this book is a must-read for anyone interested in learning more about international criminal law.

Recenzijas

'It is definitely a challenge to write a textbook on a quickly developing area such as international criminal law. Cryer et al. have succeeded in accomplishing this daunting task. The fourth edition of Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure navigates between reflecting the state of the art and presenting informed opinions on the latest developments. A must-read for anyone interested in the topic.' Harmen van der Wilt, Universiteit van Amsterdam 'This classic textbook continues to get better with each edition. It strikes the perfect balance between readability and sophistication, making it an invaluable resource for student and scholar alike.' Kevin Jon Heller, Universiteit van Amsterdam 'This is no doubt the most complete handbook on international criminal law ... an indispensable and reliable source of knowledge. The authors are to be commended for packing so much into one book and for updating it in such an accessible and conscientious way.' Elies van Sliedregt, University of Leeds 'It is definitely a challenge to write a textbook on a quickly developing area such as international criminal law. Cryer et al. have succeeded in accomplishing this daunting task. The fourth edition of Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure navigates between reflecting the state of the art and presenting informed opinions on the latest developments. A must-read for anyone interested in the topic.' Harmen van der Wilt, Universiteit van Amsterdam 'This classic textbook continues to get better with each edition. It strikes the perfect balance between readability and sophistication, making it an invaluable resource for student and scholar alike.' Kevin Jon Heller, Universiteit van Amsterdam 'This is no doubt the most complete handbook on international criminal law ... an indispensable and reliable source of knowledge. The authors are to be commended for packing so much into one book and for updating it in such an accessible and conscientious way.' Elies van Sliedregt, University of Leeds

Papildus informācija

A leading work in the field of international criminal law, which is accessible, comprehensive and up to date.
Preface to the Fourth Edition xv
Table of International Cases
xvii
Table of National Cases
liv
List of Abbreviations
lxi
List of Abbreviations of Book Titles
lxv
Part I Introduction
1(46)
1 Introduction: What is International Criminal Law?
3(25)
1.1 Meaning of international criminal law
3(2)
1.2 Other concepts of international criminal law
5(3)
1.3 Sources of international criminal law
8(5)
1.4 International criminal law and other areas of law
13(4)
1.5 A body of criminal law
17(5)
1.6 International criminal law and philosophy
22(6)
Further Reading
26(2)
2 The Aims, Objectives and Justifications of International Criminal Law
28(19)
2.1 Introduction
28(2)
2.2 What international criminal justice is for
30(8)
2.3 Broader goals
38(5)
2.4 Other critiques of criminal accountability
43(4)
Further Reading
45(2)
Part II Prosecutions in National Courts
47(66)
3 Jurisdiction
49(20)
3.1 Introduction
49(1)
3.2 Forms of jurisdiction
49(2)
3.3 Conceptual matters
51(1)
3.4 `Traditional'heads of jurisdiction
52(4)
3.5 Universal jurisdiction
56(13)
Further Reading
68(1)
4 National Prosecutions of International Crimes
69(20)
4.1 Introduction
69(1)
4.2 National prosecutions
69(5)
4.3 State obligations to prosecute or extradite
74(4)
4.4 Domestic criminal law and criminal jurisdiction
78(4)
4.5 Statutory limitations
82(2)
4.6 Non-retroactivity principle
84(1)
4.7 Ne bis in idem or double jeopardy
85(2)
4.8 Practical obstacles to national prosecutions
87(2)
Further Reading
88(1)
5 State Cooperation with Respect to National Proceedings
89(24)
5.1 Introduction
89(1)
5.2 International agreements and other bases of cooperation
90(2)
5.3 Some basic features
92(6)
5.4 Extradition
98(9)
5.5 Mutual legal assistance
107(2)
5.6 Transfer of proceedings
109(1)
5.7 Enforcement of penalties
110(3)
Further Reading
110(3)
Part III International Prosecution
113(90)
6 The History of International Criminal Prosecutions: Nuremberg and Tokyo
115(12)
6.1 Introduction
115(1)
6.2 Commission on the responsibility of the authors of the war
115(1)
6.3 Nuremberg International Military Tribunal
116(4)
6.4 Tokyo International Military Tribunal
120(5)
6.5 Control Council Law No. 10 trials and military commissions in the Pacific sphere
125(2)
Further Reading
125(2)
7 The Ad Hoc International Criminal Tribunals
127(17)
7.1 Introduction
127(1)
7.2 International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia
127(10)
7.3 International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda
137(7)
Further Reading
142(2)
8 The International Criminal Court
144(29)
8.1 Introduction
144(1)
8.2 Creation of the ICC
144(2)
8.3 Structure and composition of the ICC
146(1)
8.4 Crimes within the jurisdiction of the ICC
147(1)
8.5 Jurisdiction
148(3)
8.6 How the Court works: an overview
151(4)
8.7 Complementarity
155(6)
8.8 Gravity
161(1)
8.9 Interests of justice
162(1)
8.10 Cooperation
163(1)
8.11 Opposition to the ICC
164(5)
8.12 Appraisal
169(4)
Further Reading
171(2)
9 Other Hybrid and Special Courts
173(30)
9.1 Introduction
173(3)
9.2 Courts established by agreement between a State and an international organization or between States
176(12)
9.3 Courts established by international administration
188(5)
9.4 Courts established by a State with international support
193(5)
9.5 Relationship with the ICC
198(1)
9.6 Concluding remarks
199(4)
Further Reading
201(2)
Part IV Substantive Law of International Crimes
203(200)
10 Genocide
205(22)
10.1 Introduction
205(5)
10.2 Protected groups
210(4)
10.3 Material elements
214(5)
10.4 Mental elements
219(7)
10.5 Other modes of participation
226(1)
Further Reading
226(1)
11 Crimes Against Humanity
227(32)
11.1 Introduction
227(4)
11.2 Common elements (contextual threshold)
231(11)
11.3 Prohibited acts
242(17)
Further Reading
258(1)
12 War Crimes
259(38)
12.1 Introduction
259(10)
12.2 Common issues
269(9)
12.3 Specific offences
278(19)
Further Reading
296(1)
13 Aggression
297(22)
13.1 Introduction
297(6)
13.2 Material elements
303(8)
13.3 Mental elements
311(1)
13.4 Prosecution of aggression in the ICC
312(7)
Further Reading
317(2)
14 Transnational Crimes, Terrorism and Torture
319(22)
14.1 Introduction
319(3)
14.2 Terrorism
322(12)
14.3 Torture
334(7)
Further Reading
339(2)
15 General Principles of Liability
341(39)
15.1 Introduction
341(1)
15.2 Perpetration/commission
342(13)
15.3 Aiding and abetting
355(4)
15.4 Ordering, instigating, soliciting, inducing and inciting
359(4)
15.5 Planning, preparation, attempt and conspiracy
363(2)
15.6 Mental elements
365(3)
15.7 Command/superior responsibility
368(12)
Further Reading
379(1)
16 Defences/Grounds for Excluding Criminal Responsibility
380(23)
16.1 Introduction
380(2)
16.2 ICC Statute and defences
382(1)
16.3 Mental incapacity
383(1)
16.4 Intoxication
384(2)
16.5 Self-defence, defence of others and of property
386(3)
16.6 Duress and necessity
389(2)
16.7 Mistake of fact and law
391(2)
16.8 Superior orders
393(5)
16.9 Other defences
398(5)
Further Reading
400(3)
Part V International Criminal Procedure and Sentencing
403(78)
17 International Criminal Procedure
405(40)
17.1 General issues
405(5)
17.2 Actors
410(5)
17.3 Rights
415(5)
17.4 Jurisdiction and admissibility procedures
420(1)
17.5 Investigation
421(3)
17.6 Coercive measures
424(2)
17.7 Prosecution
426(3)
17.8 Pre-Trial Process
429(4)
17.9 Evidentiary rules
433(2)
17.10 Guilty plea and admission of guilt
435(1)
17.11 Trial stage
436(2)
17.12 Appeals and review
438(3)
17.13 Offences against the administration of justice
441(1)
17.14 Concluding remarks
441(4)
Further Reading
443(2)
18 Victims in the International Criminal Process
445(20)
18.1 Introduction
445(1)
18.2 Victims and international criminal justice
446(1)
18.3 Definition of victims
447(1)
18.4 Protection of victims and witnesses
448(3)
18.5 Victim participation at the ICC
451(8)
18.6 Reparations to victims
459(2)
18.7 An assessment
461(4)
Further Reading
463(2)
19 Punishment and Sentencing
465(16)
19.1 International penal regime
465(2)
19.2 Purposes of punishment
467(2)
19.3 Sentencing practice
469(6)
19.4 Sentencing procedures
475(1)
19.5 Pardon, early release and review of sentence
476(1)
19.6 Enforcement
477(4)
Further Reading
478(3)
Part VI Relationship Between National and International Systems
481(79)
20 State Cooperation with the International Courts and Tribunals
483(23)
20.1 Nature of the cooperation regimes
483(2)
20.2 Obligation to cooperate
485(4)
20.3 Non-States Parties, international organizations and other entities
489(3)
20.4 Authority to seek cooperation and rights of parties
492(1)
20.5 Arrest and surrender
492(3)
20.6 Other forms of legal assistance
495(4)
20.7 Domestic implementation
499(2)
20.8 Non-compliance and enforcement
501(1)
20.9 Cooperation and complementarity
502(1)
20.10 Concluding remarks
503(3)
Further Reading
504(2)
21 Immunities
506(26)
21.1 Introduction
506(6)
21.2 Functional immunity and its limits
512(5)
21.3 Personal immunity: no exception based on the crimes alleged
517(3)
21.4 Personal immunity: inroads in international courts
520(10)
21.5 Conclusion
530(2)
Further Reading
530(2)
22 Alternatives and Complements to Criminal Prosecution
532(18)
22.1 Introduction
532(2)
22.2 Amnesties
534(8)
22.3 Truth commissions
542(4)
22.4 Lustration
546(1)
22.5 Reparations and civil claims
547(1)
22.6 Local justice mechanisms
548(2)
Further Reading
549(1)
23 The Future of International Criminal Law
550(10)
23.1 Introduction
550(1)
23.2 International courts and tribunals
550(3)
23.3 National prosecutions of international crimes
553(1)
23.4 Engraining a commitment to accountability
554(2)
23.5 Evolution of substantive international criminal law
556(1)
23.6 The path forward (or back?)
557(3)
Index 560
Robert Cryer is Professor of international and Criminal Law at the University of Birmingham. He has written and edited many books on international law, criminal law and their relationship, and has taught international criminal law for more than twenty years on three continents. Darryl Robinson is Associate Professor of Law at the Faculty of Law in Queen's University, Ontario. His research focuses on moral underpinnings of criminal law principles and on refining legal rules for the fair and effective prosecution of war crimes. Sergey Vasiliev is Assistant Professor of International Criminal Law at the Faculty of Law of Universiteit van Amsterdam. He has previously taught public international law and international criminal law and procedure at Universiteit Leiden, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and Universiteit van Amsterdam. He has published extensively in these fields.