Learning Amazon Web Services (AWS): A Hands-On Guide to the Fundamentals of AWS Cloud [Mīkstie vāki]

  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 400 pages, height x width: 229x178 mm
  • Sērija : Learning
  • Izdošanas datums: 19-Jul-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers Inc
  • ISBN-10: 0135298342
  • ISBN-13: 9780135298343
  • Mīkstie vāki
  • Cena: 42,24 EUR
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  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 400 pages, height x width: 229x178 mm
  • Sērija : Learning
  • Izdošanas datums: 19-Jul-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers Inc
  • ISBN-10: 0135298342
  • ISBN-13: 9780135298343

Learning Amazon Web Services (AWS) is a clear, complete, practical, and hands-on introduction to the world’s leading cloud platform -- a perfect resource for everyone who needs to understand AWS, whatever their previous IT background.

 

Top cloud trainer and evangelist Mark Wilkins covers all you need to know to succeed with AWS, introducing each key concept in the context of a book-length case study. He teaches best practices that fully align with Amazon’s Well Architected Framework, the basis of all AWS certifications -- making this guide a valuable learning tool for those seeking to demonstrate their expertise by pursuing formal certification. Wilkins introduces new concepts based on how they are presented in the AWS self-service portal, making his coverage even easier to learn from and practice with.

 

Coverage includes:

  • The big picture: What AWS is, how it has evolved, and how it can help you
  • Foundation Core Services: compute, network, storage, and databases
  • Implementing AWS Compute Services and EC2 instances (and understanding their pricing)
  • Enforcing AWS security, compliance, and control
  • Leveraging AWS Networking Services, including VPC, CIDR, DHCP, NAT, Internet gateways, endpoints, and VPNs
  • Utilizing AWS cloud storage and databases
  • Efficiently administering and managing AWS
1 Learning AWS 1(28)
About This Book
1(1)
Trying to Define the Cloud
2(3)
Moving to AWS
5(5)
Infrastructure as a Service
6(2)
Platform as a Service
8(2)
Essential Characteristics of AWS Cloud Computing
10(4)
Operational Benefits of AWS
14(1)
Cloud Provider Limitations
15(1)
Data Security at AWS
16(2)
Network Security at AWS
18(1)
Application Security at AWS
18(1)
Compliance in the AWS Cloud
19(4)
Playing in the AWS Sandbox
20(1)
What's the Problem That Needs to Be Solved?
21(2)
Migrating Applications
23(1)
The Well-Architected Framework
24(1)
The Well-Architected Tool
25(2)
In Conclusion
27(2)
2 Designing with AWS Global Services 29(48)
Considering Location
30(2)
AWS Regions
32(3)
Region Isolation
34(1)
Availability Zones
35(3)
Availability Zone Distribution
37(1)
Multiple Availability Zones
38(2)
What's the AWS Service-Level Agreement?
40(4)
Everything Fails
42(2)
Global Edge Services
44(5)
Services Located at the Edge
44(5)
Choosing a Region
49(4)
Compliance
49(4)
AWS and Compliance
53(4)
HIPAA
54(1)
NIST
55(1)
GovCloud
56(1)
Latency Concerns
57(1)
Services Offered at Each Region
58(1)
Calculating Costs
59(1)
Management Service Costs
60(2)
Management Tools Pricing: AWS Config
61(1)
AWS Compute Costs
62(1)
Storage Costs
63(1)
Data Transfer Costs
64(3)
Understand Tiered Costs at AWS
66(1)
Optimizing Costs at AWS
67(2)
Optimizing Compute Costs
67(2)
Tools for Analyzing Costs at AWS
69(4)
Trusted Advisor
69(4)
AWS Simple Monthly Calculator
73(3)
Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) Calculator
75(1)
In Conclusion
76(1)
Top 10 Big-Picture Discussion Points: Compliance, Governance, Latency, and Failover Considerations
76(1)
3 AWS Networking Services 77(70)
VPC Networking
78(3)
Partnering with AWS
79(2)
What's Behind the Networking Curtain?
81(5)
It's All About Packet Flow
83(3)
Creating Your First VPC
86(4)
How Many VPCs?
90(1)
Creating the VPC CIDR Block
91(2)
Planning Your Primary VPC CIDR Block
91(2)
The Default VPC
93(2)
Revisiting Availability Zones
95(1)
Creating Subnets
95(3)
NAT Services
97(1)
Working with Route Tables
98(4)
The Main Route Table
99(3)
Private IPV4 Addresses
102(2)
Elastic IP Addresses
104(3)
Traffic Charges
106(1)
Bring Your Own IP (BYOIP)
107(3)
The BYOIP Process
108(2)
IPv6 Addresses
110(1)
Security Groups
110(7)
Custom Security Groups
113(4)
Network ACLs
117(4)
Network ACL Implementation Details
118(3)
Understanding Ephemeral Ports
121(2)
VPC Flow Logs
122(1)
Peering VPCs
123(2)
Establishing a Peering Connection
123(2)
Gateway VPC Endpoints
125(6)
Interface VPC Endpoints
128(3)
VPC Connectivity
131(2)
Internet Gateway: The Public Door
131(2)
VPN Connections
133(3)
Virtual Private Gateway
134(2)
VPN Connections
136(1)
VPN CloudHub
137(1)
Understanding Route Propagation
137(1)
Direct Connect
138(1)
Route 53
139(4)
Route 53 Routing Options
141(1)
Route 53 Health Checks
142(1)
Using DNS with a VPC: Private DNS Zones
143(1)
DNS Hostnames
143(1)
In Conclusion
144(1)
Top 10 Discussion Points: Considerations for Security, Failover, and Connectivity
145(2)
4 Compute Services: AWS EC2 Instances 147(62)
A Short History of EC2 Virtualization
148(2)
The Nitro System
150(2)
EC2 Instances
152(1)
Instance Families
153(1)
What's a vCPU?
154(1)
EC2 Instance Choices
155(2)
General-Purpose Instances
156(1)
Instances Designed to Burst
157(6)
Compute-Optimized Instances
159(1)
Memory-Optimized Instances
159(1)
Accelerated Computing (GPU)
160(1)
Storage-Optimized Instances
161(1)
Bare-Metal Instances
161(1)
Dedicated Hosts
162(1)
Dedicated Instances
162(1)
EC2 Network Performance
163(1)
Amazon Machine Images (AMIs)
164(2)
Choosing an AMI
166(2)
AWS Linux AMIs
166(1)
Linux AMI Virtualization Types
166(1)
Windows AMIs
167(1)
AWS Marketplace
167(1)
Creating a Custom AMI
168(2)
Custom Instance Store AMIs
170(1)
Proper AMI Design
171(6)
AMI Build Considerations
173(1)
AMI Best Practices
174(1)
Adopting a Best Practice: Tags
175(1)
Using Launch Templates
176(1)
Changing the Current Instance Type
176(1)
EC2 Pricing
177(1)
Reserved Instances (RI)
178(6)
Reserved Instance Limits
179(2)
Reserved EC2 Instances Types
181(1)
Scheduled Reserved EC2 Instances
182(1)
Spot Instance
182(2)
Spot Fleet
184(2)
Spot Capacity Pools
185(1)
EC2 Fleet
186(1)
EC2 Instance Storage Options
187(2)
Local Instance Storage-SSD or Magnetic Disk
187(2)
EC2 Auto Recovery
189(1)
Ordering an Instance
190(6)
Migrating to AWS
196(6)
Migration Big-Picture Steps
197(2)
AWS Migration Hub
199(1)
AWS Server Migration Services
200(1)
Server Migration Big Steps
201(1)
Importing and Exporting Virtual Resources
202(1)
Other Ways to Host Workloads at AWS
202(6)
Containers
203(1)
Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS)
204(1)
AWS Fargate
205(1)
AWS ECS for Kubernetes (EKS)
205(1)
Amazon LightSail
206(1)
Lambda
206(2)
AWS Firecracker
208(1)
In Conclusion
208(1)
Top 10 Big-Picture Discussion Points: Migration and Planning Considerations
208(1)
5 Planning for Scale and Resiliency 209(46)
The Concept of Monitoring
211(2)
What Is CloudWatch?
213(4)
Monitoring
214(1)
Logging
215(1)
Collecting Data with the CloudWatch Agent
216(1)
CloudWatch Agent Install Steps
217(1)
Planning for Monitoring
217(2)
CloudWatch Integration
219(1)
CloudWatch Terminology
220(4)
Using the Dashboard
224(2)
Creating a CloudWatch Alarm
224(1)
Additional Alarm and Action Settings
225(1)
Actions
226(1)
Monitoring EC2 Instances
226(1)
Automatically Reboot or Recover Instances
226(1)
Elastic Load Balancing Services
227(4)
Redundancy by Design
229(1)
EC2 Health Checks
230(1)
Additional ELB Features
231(2)
Application Load Balancer (ALB)
233(9)
Big-Picture Steps: ALB Creation
234(3)
Rule Choices
237(2)
HTTPS Listener Security Settings
239(1)
Target Group Routing
240(1)
Maintaining User Sessions
241(1)
Sticky Session Support
242(1)
Configuring Health Checks
242(2)
Monitoring Load Balancer Operation
243(1)
Network Load Balancer
244(1)
Scaling Applications
245(2)
EC2 Auto Scaling
245(1)
EC2 Auto Scaling Components
246(1)
Launch Configuration
246(1)
Launch Templates
247(2)
Auto Scaling Groups (ASGs)
248(1)
Scaling Options for Auto Scaling Groups
249(2)
Lifecycle Hooks
251(1)
AWS Auto Scaling
251(1)
In Conclusion
252(1)
Top 10 Big-Picture Discussion Points: Scale, Availability, and Monitoring Decisions
252(3)
6 Cloud Storage 255(60)
Cloud Storage
256(3)
Which Storage Matches Your Workload?
258(1)
EBS Block Storage
259(7)
EBS Volume Types
260(1)
General-Purpose SSD (gp2)
261(3)
Elastic EBS Volumes
264(1)
Attaching an EBS Volume
264(1)
EBS Volume Encryption
265(1)
EBS Snapshots
266(3)
Tagging EBS Volumes and Snapshots
268(1)
EBS Best Practices
269(1)
S3 Storage
269(5)
Buckets, Objects, and Keys
270(2)
S3 Data Consistency
272(1)
S3 Storage Classes
273(1)
S3 Management
274(4)
Versioning
277(1)
S3 Bucket Security
278(2)
Amazon S3 Glacier Archive Storage
280(1)
S3 Glacier Vaults and Archives
281(1)
Shared File Systems at AWS
281(1)
Elastic File System (EFS)
282(2)
EFS Performance Modes
283(1)
EFS Throughput Modes
283(1)
EFS Security
284(1)
Storage Performance Compared
284(2)
Amazon FSx for Windows File Server
286(1)
Relational Database Service (RDS)
287(5)
RDS Database Instances
288(2)
High Availability for RDS
290(2)
Big-Picture RDS Installation Steps
292(2)
Monitoring Database Performance
293(1)
Best Practices for RDS
293(1)
Aurora
294(4)
Aurora Storage
295(2)
Communicating with Aurora
297(1)
DynamoDB
298(3)
Database Design 101
300(1)
DynamoDB Tables
301(7)
Provisioning Table Capacity
302(2)
Adaptive Capacity
304(1)
Data Consistency
305(1)
ACID and DynamoDB
306(1)
Global Tables
307(1)
DynamoDB Accelerator (DAX)
308(1)
Backup and Restore
308(1)
ElastiCache
308(1)
AWS Data Transfer Options
309(2)
The Snow Family
311(1)
AWS Storage Gateway Family
312(1)
In Conclusion
313(1)
Top 10 Big-Picture Discussion Points: Storage Options and Considerations
314(1)
7 Security Services 315(58)
Identity and Access Management
317(8)
IAM Policy Defined
319(1)
IAM Authentication
320(2)
Requesting Access to AWS Resources
322(1)
The Authorization Process
323(1)
Actions
324(1)
IAM Users
325(3)
The Root User
326(2)
The IAM User
328(1)
Creating an IAM User
328(9)
IAM User Access keys
329(3)
IAM Groups
332(1)
Signing In as an IAM User
332(1)
IAM Account Details
332(1)
IAM User Account Summary
333(1)
Creating a Password Policy
334(1)
Rotating Access Keys
335(2)
Using Multifactor Authentication (MFA)
337(1)
IAM Policy Types
337(4)
Identity-Based Policies
337(3)
Resource-Based Policies
340(1)
In-Line Policies
340(1)
IAM Policy Creation
341(2)
Policy Elements
342(1)
Reading a Simple JSON Policy
343(1)
Policy Actions
344(4)
Additional Policy Control Options
345(3)
Reviewing the Policy Permissions Applied
348(2)
IAM Policy Versions
349(1)
Using Conditional Elements
350(1)
Using Tags with IAM Identities
350(1)
IAM Roles
351(3)
When to Use Roles
352(2)
Cross-Account Access to AWS Resources
354(1)
The AWS Security Token Service (STS)
355(2)
Identity Federation
357(1)
IAM Best Practices
358(2)
IAM Security Tools
360(3)
Creating a CloudWatch Trail Event
363(2)
Other AWS Security Services
365(6)
AWS Organizations
365(1)
Resource Access Manager (AWS RAM)
366(2)
Secrets Manager
368(1)
GuardDuty
369(1)
AWS Inspector
370(1)
In Conclusion
371(1)
Top 10 Big-Picture Discussion Points
371(2)
8 Automating AWS Infrastructure 373(36)
Automating with AWS
373(2)
From Manual to Automated Infrastructure with CloudFormation
375(2)
CloudFormation Components
377(4)
CloudFormation Templates
378(2)
Stacks
380(1)
Creating an EC2 Instance with EIP
381(1)
Updating with Change Sets
382(2)
Working with CloudFormation Stack Sets
383(1)
AWS Service Catalog
384(2)
The 12-Factor Methodology
386(8)
Rule
1. Codebase-One Codebase That Is Tracked with Version Control Allows Many Deploys
386(1)
AWS CodeCommit
387(1)
Rule
2. Dependencies-Explicitly Declare and Isolate Dependencies
388(1)
Rule
3. Config-Store Config in the Environment
388(1)
Rule
4. Backing Services-Treat Backing Services as Attached Resources
389(1)
Rule
5. Build, Release, Run-Separate, Build, and Run Stages
389(1)
Rule
6. Process-Execute the App as One or More Stateless Processes
390(2)
Rule
7. Port Binding-Export Services via Port Binding
392(1)
Rule
8. Concurrency-Scale Out via the Process Model
392(1)
Rule
9. Disposability-Maximize Robustness with Fast Startup and Graceful Shutdown
392(1)
Rule
10. Dev/Prod Parity-Keep Development, Staging, and Production as Similar as Possible
393(1)
Rule
11. Logs-Treat Logs as Event Streams
393(1)
Rule
12. Admin Processes-Run Admin/Management Tasks as One-Off Processes
393(1)
Elastic Beanstalk
394(3)
Updating Elastic Beanstalk Applications
396(1)
CodePipeline
397(3)
AWS CodeDeploy
399(1)
Serviceless Computing with Lambda
400(2)
API Gateway
402(2)
Building a Serverless Web App
404(3)
Create a Static Website
404(1)
User Authentication
405(1)
Serverless Back-End Components
405(1)
Set Up the API Gateway
406(1)
In Conclusion
407(1)
Top 10 Big-Picture Discussion Points: Moving Toward Stateless Design
407(2)
Index 409
Mark Wilkins is an Electronic Engineering Technologist with a wealth of experience in designing, deploying, and supporting software and hardware technology in the corporate and small business world. Since 2013, Mark has focused on supporting and designing cloud service solutions with Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and the IBM Cloud. He is certified in Amazon Web Services (Architecture and Sys-Ops). Mark is also a Microsoft Certified Trainer (MCT) and holds certifications in MCTS, MCSA, Server Virtualization with Windows Server Hyper-V, and Azure Cloud Services. Mark worked as a technical evangelist for IBM SoftLayer from 2013 through 2016 and taught both SoftLayer Fundamentals and SoftLayer Design classes to many Fortune 500 companies in Canada, the United States, Europe, and Australia. As course director for Global Knowledge, Mark developed and taught many technical seminars, including Configuring Active Directory Services, Configuring Group Policy, and Cloud and Virtualization Essentials. Mark also developed courseware for the Microsoft Official Curriculum 2008 stream, Managing and Maintaining Windows Server 2008 Network Services, and Active Directory Services. Mark's published books include Windows 2003 Registry for Dummies, Administering SMS 3.0, and Administering Active Directory.