Rub Out the Words: Letters 1959-1974 [Mīkstie vāki]

  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 496 pages, height x width x depth: 198x129x21 mm, weight: 352 g, Illustrations, ports.
  • Sērija : Penguin Modern Classics
  • Izdošanas datums: 07-Mar-2013
  • Izdevniecība: Penguin Classics
  • ISBN-10: 0141189800
  • ISBN-13: 9780141189802
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 496 pages, height x width x depth: 198x129x21 mm, weight: 352 g, Illustrations, ports.
  • Sērija : Penguin Modern Classics
  • Izdošanas datums: 07-Mar-2013
  • Izdevniecība: Penguin Classics
  • ISBN-10: 0141189800
  • ISBN-13: 9780141189802
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
These letters cover the activities of Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Jack Kerouac in the years that gave birth to the Beat Generation. Written mostly to Ginsberg or Kerouac, the letters provide a rare glimpse into Burroughs's psyche, revealing his struggle with drug addiction, his confusion over his sexual identity, and his search for a form fluid enough to mirror his mind and art.

Papildus informācija

William Burroughs' life was often as extreme as his prose. This second volume of his letters documents the time after the notorious publication of Naked Lunch in 1959, as he drifted away from the Beats and on towards new experiences in Europe and North Africa.
William S. Burroughs was born on February 5, 1914 in St Louis. In work and in life Burroughs expressed a lifelong subversion of the morality, politics and economics of modern America. To escape those conditions, and in particular his treatment as a homosexual and a drug-user, Burroughs left his homeland in 1950, and soon after began writing. By the time of his death he was widely recognised as one of the most politically trenchant, culturally influential, and innovative artists of the twentieth century. His numerous books include Naked Lunch, Junky, Queer, Nova Express, Interzone, The Wild Boys, The Ticket That Exploded and The Soft Machine. After living in Mexico City, Tangier, Paris, and London, Burroughs finally returned to America in 1974. He died in 1997.