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Sustainable Engineering: Principles and Practice [Hardback]

(Ohio State University)
  • Formāts: Hardback, 490 pages, height x width x depth: 253x192x27 mm, weight: 1210 g, Worked examples or Exercises; 87 Tables, black and white; 19 Halftones, black and white; 168 Line drawings, black and white
  • Izdošanas datums: 13-Jun-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 1108420451
  • ISBN-13: 9781108420457
  • Hardback
  • Cena: 102,81 €
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  • Formāts: Hardback, 490 pages, height x width x depth: 253x192x27 mm, weight: 1210 g, Worked examples or Exercises; 87 Tables, black and white; 19 Halftones, black and white; 168 Line drawings, black and white
  • Izdošanas datums: 13-Jun-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Cambridge University Press
  • ISBN-10: 1108420451
  • ISBN-13: 9781108420457
Drawing on multidisciplinary perspectives from engineering, economics, business, science, and human behavior, this text presents an unrivalled introduction to how engineering practice can contribute to sustainable development. Varied approaches for assessing the sustainability of engineering and other human activities are presented in detail, and potential solutions to meet key challenges are proposed, with an emphasis on those that require engineering skills. Each concept and approach is supported by mathematical representation, solved problems, real-world examples, and self-study exercises. Topics covered range from introductory material on the nature of sustainability, to more advanced approaches for assessment and design. Prerequisites for each chapter are clearly explained so the text can be adapted to meet the needs of students from a range of backgrounds. Software tutorials, project statements and solutions, lecture slides, and a solutions manual accompany the book online, making this an invaluable resource for courses in sustainable engineering, as well as a useful reference for industry practitioners.

Recenzijas

'This book addresses such critical topics as life-cycle assessment, energy and material flows, exergy, sustainability assessment, engineering design, industrial symbiosis, and circular economy. The author utilizes various case studies/examples, such as the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and the lessons from Easter Island. There are flowcharts and solved quantitative examples that make the introduced concepts less abstract. Each chapter is followed by exercises, making it easier to use for academic purpose / course assessment. I believe this text will be useful for advanced undergraduate or graduate-level college students, and that it is successful in its goal to rigorously address the role of engineering with respect to environmental sustainability, and to help engineers understand sustainability.' John W. Sutherland, Fehsenfeld Family Head of Environmental and Ecological Engineering, Purdue University 'In Sustainable Engineering, Bhavik R. Bakshi demonstrates that engineers and conservationists can be important allies. Using a variety of real-world examples and detailed case studies, Bakshi makes the case that engineering practices can lead to a sustainable future.' Mark R. Tercek, CEO of The Nature Conservancy and author of Nature's Fortune: How Business and Society Thrive by Investing in Nature 'Sustainable Engineering provides a comprehensive engineering treatment of sustainability. This is the only textbook covering many of the new approaches to sustainable engineering. Clear, succinct chapters, and the range of quantitative problems, make for a welcome textbook that will be widely useful for undergraduate engineering classes. It includes recent concepts such as water footprinting, energy return on investment, material flow analysis, energy analysis, ecosystem services calculations, techno-economic analysis, and industrial symbiosis. The problems are quantitative and thorough, with sufficient worked examples that they can be mastered in an introductory sustainable engineering course. The sustainability framing is broad and thorough, allowing undergraduates to see the big-picture context for sustainable engineering. References are also excellent, encouraging students to become familiar with key data sources, software, and the relevant scientific literature.' Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Professor of Natural Systems, Georgia Institute of Technology 'This book addresses such critical topics as life-cycle assessment, energy and material flows, exergy, sustainability assessment, engineering design, industrial symbiosis, and circular economy. The author utilizes various case studies/examples, such as the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and the lessons from Easter Island. There are flowcharts and solved quantitative examples that make the introduced concepts less abstract. Each chapter is followed by exercises, making it easier to use for academic purpose / course assessment. I believe this text will be useful for advanced undergraduate or graduate-level college students, and that it is successful in its goal to rigorously address the role of engineering with respect to environmental sustainability, and to help engineers understand sustainability.' John W. Sutherland, Fehsenfeld Family Head of Environmental and Ecological Engineering, Purdue University 'In Sustainable Engineering, Bhavik R. Bakshi demonstrates that engineers and conservationists can be important allies. Using a variety of real-world examples and detailed case studies, Bakshi makes the case that engineering practices can lead to a sustainable future.' Mark R. Tercek, CEO of The Nature Conservancy and author of Nature's Fortune: How Business and Society Thrive by Investing in Nature 'Sustainable Engineering provides a comprehensive engineering treatment of sustainability. This is the only textbook covering many of the new approaches to sustainable engineering. Clear, succinct chapters, and the range of quantitative problems, make for a welcome textbook that will be widely useful for undergraduate engineering classes. It includes recent concepts such as water footprinting, energy return on investment, material flow analysis, energy analysis, ecosystem services calculations, techno-economic analysis, and industrial symbiosis. The problems are quantitative and thorough, with sufficient worked examples that they can be mastered in an introductory sustainable engineering course. The sustainability framing is broad and thorough, allowing undergraduates to see the big-picture context for sustainable engineering. References are also excellent, encouraging students to become familiar with key data sources, software, and the relevant scientific literature.' Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Professor of Natural Systems, Georgia Institute of Technology

Papildus informācija

A multidisciplinary introduction to sustainable engineering exploring challenges and solutions through practical examples and exercises.
Preface xvii
Part I Introduction and Motivation 1(72)
1 The Basis of Human Well-Being
3(17)
1.1 Trends in Human Development
3(4)
1.2 What Does Human Well-Being Depend On?
7(4)
1.3 Ecosystem Goods and Services
11(5)
1.4 What about Saving the Planet?
16(1)
1.5 Summary
17(1)
1.6 Review Questions
17(1)
References
18(2)
2 Status of Ecosystem Goods and Services
20(30)
2.1 Fuels
20(1)
2.2 Materials
21(6)
2.3 Water
27(3)
2.4 Food
30(1)
2.5 Soil
31(1)
2.6 Air Quality Regulation
31(3)
2.7 Climate Regulation
34(1)
2.8 Water Quality Regulation
35(2)
2.9 Net Primary Productivity
37(2)
2.10 Pollination
39(1)
2.11 Biodiversity
40(2)
2.12 Overall Status
42(2)
2.13 Summary
44(1)
2.14 Review Questions
45(2)
References
47(3)
3 Sustainability: Definitions and Challenges
50(23)
3.1 Definitions
52(1)
3.2 Nature of Environmental Problems
53(8)
3.2.1 Energy-Efficient Lighting
56(1)
3.2.2 Sustainable Transportation
57(4)
3.3 Nature of the Sustainability Challenge
61(3)
3.3.1 Need for Sustainable Engineering
61(1)
3.3.2 Wicked Nature of Sustainability
62(2)
3.4 Requirements for Sustainability
64(2)
3.5 Approaches Toward Sustainable Engineering
66(2)
3.6 Summary
68(1)
3.7 Review Questions
69(2)
References
71(2)
Part II Reasons for Unsustainability 73(66)
4 Economics and the Environment
75(19)
4.1 The Free Market Economy
75(3)
4.2 Environmental Externalities
78(4)
4.3 Discounting and Benefit-Cost Analysis
82(5)
4.4 Substitutability
87(2)
4.5 A Scientific View of the Economy
89(1)
4.6 Summary
90(1)
4.7 Review Questions
91(2)
References
93(1)
5 Business and the Environment
94(18)
5.1 Pre-1980s: Environmental Protection as a Threat
94(4)
5.2 Post-1980s: Environmental Protection as an Opportunity
98(3)
5.3 Modern View: Corporate Sustainability
101(3)
5.4 The Future of Corporate Sustainability
104(3)
Joseph Fiksel
5.5 Summary
107(1)
5.6 Review Questions
108(2)
References
110(2)
6 Science, Engineering, and the Environment
112(14)
6.1 The Attitude
112(3)
6.2 The Approach
115(5)
6.2.1 Reductionism
115(2)
6.2.2 Holism
117(3)
6.3 The Outcome
120(2)
6.4 Summary
122(1)
6.5 Review Questions
122(3)
References
125(1)
7 Society and the Environment
126(13)
7.1 Cultural Narrative
126(4)
7.2 Ecological Literacy
130(1)
7.3 Political Aspects
131(2)
7.4 Ethics, Morals, and Religion
133(1)
7.5 Summary
134(1)
7.6 Review Questions
135(1)
References
136(3)
Part III Sustainability Assessment 139(202)
8 Goal Definition and Scope
141(12)
8.1 Nature of Life Cycle Networks
141(2)
8.2 Steps in Assessing Life Cycle Networks
143(1)
8.3 Goal Definition and Scope
144(6)
8.3.1 Functional Unit
144(2)
8.3.2 Life Cycle Boundary
146(4)
8.4 Summary
150(1)
8.5 Review Questions
150(2)
References
152(1)
9 Inventory Analysis
153(21)
9.1 Sources of Data
153(2)
9.2 Calculations
155(8)
9.3 Uncertainty
163(6)
9.4 Summary
169(1)
9.5 Review Questions
169(3)
References
172(2)
10 Mathematical Framework
174(33)
10.1 Process Network Analysis
174(12)
10.1.1 Mathematical Framework
175(7)
10.1.2 Allocation Methods
182(4)
10.2 Input-Output Analysis
186(10)
10.2.1 Mathematical Framework
186(5)
10.2.2 Environmentally Extended Input-Output Models
191(5)
10.3 Hybrid Models
196(5)
10.4 Summary
201(1)
10.5 Review Questions
202(3)
References
205(2)
11 Footprint Assessment
207(18)
11.1 Carbon Footprint
207(8)
11.2 Water Footprint
215(4)
11.3 Characteristics of Footprint Methods
219(1)
11.4 Review Questions
220(3)
References
223(2)
12 Energy and Material Flow Analysis
225(21)
12.1 Energy Analysis
225(3)
12.2 Energy Analysis of Processes
228(5)
12.3 Net Energy Analysis
233(4)
12.4 Material Flow Analysis
237(4)
12.5 Summary
241(1)
12.6 Review Questions
242(3)
References
245(1)
13 Exergy Analysis
246(24)
13.1 Concept of Exergy
246(7)
13.2 Exergy Flow in Systems
253(1)
13.3 Exergetic Assessment
254(12)
13.3.1 Improving Efficiency
255(3)
13.3.2 Exergy Analysis of Technologies
258(7)
13.3.3 Exergy Analysis of Economies
265(1)
13.4 Summary
266(1)
13.5 Review Questions
267(2)
References
269(1)
14 Cumulative Exergy Consumption and Emergy Analysis
270(27)
14.1 Cumulative Exergy
270(5)
14.2 Aggregation and Resource Quality
275(4)
14.3 Exergy Flow in Ecological and Economic Systems
279(1)
14.4 Emergy Analysis
280(11)
14.4.1 Emergy of Natural Resources
283(3)
14.4.2 Emergy Algebra
286(3)
14.4.3 Aggregate Metrics
289(2)
14.5 Summary
291(1)
14.6 Review Questions
291(4)
References
295(2)
15 Life Cycle Impact Assessment
297(20)
15.1 Steps in Life Cycle Impact Assessment
297(13)
15.1.1 Classification into Impact Categories
299(1)
15.1.2 Characterization into Common Units
299(2)
15.1.3 Normalization and Weighting
301(3)
15.1.4 End-Point Assessment
304(6)
15.2 Software for Sustainability Assessment
310(1)
15.3 Summary
310(2)
15.4 Review Questions
312(4)
References
316(1)
16 Ecosystem Services in Sustainability Assessment
317(24)
16.1 Synergies Between Human and Natural Systems
318(2)
16.2 Ecosystem Services in Life Cycle Assessment
320(9)
16.2.1 Goal and Scope Definition
321(2)
16.2.2 Inventory Analysis
323(3)
16.2.3 Impact Assessment
326(2)
16.2.4 Interpretation and Improvement
328(1)
16.3 Computational Structure
329(4)
16.4 Satisfying the Requirements for Sustainability
333(1)
16.5 Summary
334(1)
16.6 Review Questions
335(4)
References
339(2)
Part IV Solutions for Sustainability 341(126)
17 Designing Sustainable Processes and Products
343(24)
17.1 Techno-Economic Analysis and Design
344(6)
17.1.1 Costs and Earnings
344(2)
17.1.2 Time Value of Money
346(2)
17.1.3 Profitability Metrics
348(2)
17.2 Eco-Efficiency
350(4)
17.3 Process and Product Design
354(7)
17.3.1 Evolution of Engineering Design
354(1)
17.3.2 Decisions with Multiple Objectives
355(3)
17.3.3 Heuristic Design
358(3)
17.4 Shortcomings
361(1)
17.5 Summary
362(1)
17.6 Review Questions
363(3)
References
366(1)
18 Ecosystem Ecology
367(19)
18.1 Characteristics of Ecosystems
368(1)
18.2 Material Cycles and Energetics
369(9)
18.2.1 Food Web
370(3)
18.2.2 Biogeochemical Cycles
373(1)
18.2.3 Energy Transformation
374(4)
18.3 Dynamics of Ecosystems
378(4)
18.3.1 Nature of Ecosystem Dynamics
378(2)
18.3.2 Understanding Ecosystem Dynamics
380(2)
18.4 Summary
382(1)
18.5 Review Questions
383(2)
References
385(1)
19 Industrial Symbiosis and the Circular Economy
386(21)
19.1 Biomimetic Product Innovation
386(2)
19.2 Industrial Symbiosis
388(8)
19.3 The Circular Economy
396(4)
19.4 Summary
400(1)
19.5 Review Questions
401(4)
References
405(2)
20 Ecosystems in Engineering
407(25)
20.1 Traditional Ecological Knowledge
407(4)
20.2 Nature-Based Solutions
411(8)
20.2.1 Ecological Engineering
411(6)
20.2.2 Green Infrastructure
417(2)
20.3 Techno-Ecological Synergy
419(8)
20.3.1 Motivation
419(2)
20.3.2 Approach
421(6)
20.4 Summary
427(1)
20.5 Review Questions
427(3)
References
430(2)
21 Economic Policies
432(16)
21.1 Internalizing Externalities
432(9)
21.1.1 Non-Market-Based Policies
433(1)
21.1.2 Market-Based Policies
434(7)
21.2 Inclusive Wealth
441(4)
21.3 Summary
445(1)
21.4 Review Questions
445(2)
References
447(1)
22 Societal Development
448(19)
22.1 Individual Action
448(3)
22.2 Belief and Value Systems
451(9)
22.3 Worldviews and Future Scenarios
460(4)
22.3.1 Worldviews: Technological Optimist or Skeptic?
460(2)
22.3.2 Toward a Good Anthropocene
462(2)
22.4 Summary
464(1)
22.5 Review Questions
464(2)
References
466(1)
Index 467
Bhavik R. Bakshi is the Morrow Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Ohio State University (OSU). He also holds appointments in Civil, Environmental and Geodetic Engineering at OSU and as a Visiting Professor at the Indian Institute of Technology in Mumbai, India. He has developed and taught a course on Sustainable Engineering for twenty years at OSU, and shorter versions at institutions such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, McGill University, Montreal, and South China University of Technology.