Unlocking Criminal Law 6th New edition [Mīkstie vāki]

(Jauns izdevums: 9780367244736)
  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 618 pages, height x width: 248x191 mm, weight: 1406 g, 53 Line drawings, color; 30 Tables, color
  • Sērija : Unlocking the Law
  • Izdošanas datums: 21-Jun-2017
  • Izdevniecība: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138657638
  • ISBN-13: 9781138657632 (Jauns izdevums: 9780367244736)
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
  • Mīkstie vāki
  • Cena: 21,85 EUR*
  • * Šī grāmata vairs netiek publicēta. Jums tiks paziņota lietotas grāmatas cena
  • Standarta cena: 47,42 EUR
  • Ietaupiet 54%
  • Pievienot vēlmju sarakstam
  • Šī grāmata vairs netiek publicēta. Jums tiks paziņota lietotas grāmatas cena.
  • Ielikt grozā
  • Daudzums:
  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 618 pages, height x width: 248x191 mm, weight: 1406 g, 53 Line drawings, color; 30 Tables, color
  • Sērija : Unlocking the Law
  • Izdošanas datums: 21-Jun-2017
  • Izdevniecība: Routledge
  • ISBN-10: 1138657638
  • ISBN-13: 9781138657632 (Jauns izdevums: 9780367244736)
Citas grāmatas par šo tēmu:
Unlocking Criminal Law will help you grasp the main concepts of the subject with ease. Containing accessible explanations in clear and precise terms that are easy to understand, it provides an excellent foundation for learning and revising Criminal Law.The information is clearly presented in a logical structure and the following features support learning helping you to advance with confidence:Clear learning outcomes at the beginning of each chapter set out the skills and knowledge you will need to get to grips with the subjectKey Facts boxes throughout each chapter allow you to progressively build and consolidate your understandingEnd-of-chapter summaries provide a useful check-list for each topicCases and judgments are highlighted to help you find them and add them to your notes quicklyFrequent activities and self-test questions are included so you can put your knowledge into practiceSample essay questions with annotated answers prepare you for assessmentGlossary of legal terms clarifies important definitions 
Acknowledgements xiv
Guide to the book xv
Preface xvii
List of figures
xviii
Table of cases
xix
Table of statutory instruments
xxxvii
Table of legislation
xxxviii
Table of European instruments
xliv
PART I CONCEPTS IN CRIMINAL LAW
1(312)
1 Introduction To Criminal Law
3(30)
1.1 Purpose of criminal law
3(4)
1.1.1 Should the law enforce moral values?
4(2)
1.1.2 Example of the changing nature of criminal law
6(1)
1.2 Sources of criminal law
7(3)
1.2.1 Common law offences
7(1)
1.2.2 Statutory offences
8(1)
1.2.3 Codification of the criminal law
8(2)
1.2.4 Reform of the law
10(1)
1.3 Defining a crime
10(2)
1.3.1 Conduct criminalised by the judges
10(1)
1.3.2 Retroactive effect of case law
11(1)
1.4 Classification of offences
12(2)
1.4.1 Classifying law by its source
12(1)
1.4.2 Categories for purposes of police powers of detention
12(1)
1.4.3 Classifying by the type of harm caused by the crime
13(1)
1.4.4 Classification by where a case will be tried
13(1)
1.5 Criminal justice system
14(4)
1.5.1 Trials in the magistrates' courts
14(1)
1.5.2 Trials in the Crown Court
14(1)
1.5.3 Appeals from a magistrates' court
15(1)
1.5.4 Appeals from trials in the Crown Court
16(2)
1.5.5 The hierarchy of the courts
18(1)
1.6 Sentencing
18(1)
1.6.1 Purposes of sentencing
18(1)
1.7 Elements of a crime
18(1)
1.8 Burden and standard of proof
19(2)
1.8.1 Presumption of innocence
19(1)
1.8.2 Raising a defence
20(1)
1.8.3 Standard of proof
21(1)
1.9 Criminal law and human rights
21(12)
1.9.1 The right to a fair trial
22(1)
1.9.2 Burden of proof
22(4)
1.9.3 No punishment without law
26(2)
1.9.4 Other human rights
28(2)
1.9.5 Human rights and criminal procedure
30(2)
Further reading
32(1)
2 Actus Reus
33(28)
2.1 The physical element
33(2)
2.1.1 Conduct and consequences
34(1)
2.1.2 Circumstances
34(1)
2.1.3 The physical element alone is not a crime
34(1)
2.1.4 Omissions
35(1)
2.2 Voluntary conduct
35(1)
2.3 Omissions
35(8)
2.3.1 Commission by omission
35(1)
2.3.2 Imposition of a duty to act
36(6)
2.3.3 Breach of duty to act
42(1)
2.3.4 Reform
42(1)
2.4 Causation
43(18)
2.4.1 Factual causation
43(1)
2.4.2 Legal causation
44(13)
Sample essay questions
57(3)
Further reading
60(1)
3 Mens Rea
61(22)
3.1 The mental element
61(1)
3.2 Intention
62(5)
3.2.1 Direct intention
62(1)
3.2.2 Oblique intention
62(5)
3.3 Recklessness
67(5)
3.3.1 The Cunningham test
67(1)
3.3.2 The Caldwell years: 1981-2003
68(1)
3.3.3 Back to Cunningham: C and another
69(3)
3.4 Negligence
72(1)
3.5 Dishonesty
72(1)
3.6 Transferred malice
72(4)
3.7 Coincidence of actus reus and mens rea
76(7)
Sample essay question
79(2)
Further reading
81(2)
4 Strict Liability
83(32)
4.1 Absolute liability
84(1)
4.2 Strict Liability
85(4)
4.2.1 No due diligence defence
87(1)
4.2.2 No defence of mistake
87(1)
4.2.3 Summary of strict liability
87(2)
4.3 Common law strict liability offences
89(1)
4.4 Statutory strict liability offences
90(18)
4.4.1 The presumption of mans rea
91(1)
4.4.2 The Gammon criteria
92(1)
4.4.3 Looking at the wording of an Act
93(1)
4.4.4 Quasi-criminal offences
94(2)
4.4.5 Strict liability and human rights
96(2)
4.4.6 Issues of social concern
98(2)
4.4.7 Promoting enforcement of the law
100(1)
4.4.8 Twenty-first-century cases
100(8)
4.5 Justification for strict liability
108(1)
4.5.1 Arguments against strict liability
109(1)
4.6 Proposals for reform
109(6)
Sample essay question
111(2)
Further reading
113(2)
5 Parties To A Crime
115(20)
5.1 Principal offenders
115(1)
5.1.1 Difficulties in identifying the principal
115(1)
5.2 Innocent agents
116(1)
5.3 Secondary parties
116(11)
5.3.1 Actus reus of secondary parties: aiding, abetting, counselling or procuring
117(5)
5.3.2 Mens rea of secondary parties
122(5)
5.4 Withdrawal from participation
127(2)
5.4.1 Pre-planned criminal activity
127(1)
5.4.2 Spontaneous criminal activity
128(1)
5.5 Assisting an offender
129(1)
5.6 Reform
129(6)
Sample essay question
131(1)
Further reading
132(3)
6 Inchoate Offences
135(34)
6.1 Inchoate offences
135(1)
6.2 Attempt
136(10)
6.2.1 Actus reus of attempt
136(4)
6.2.2 Mens rea of attempt
140(2)
6.2.3 Impossibility
142(2)
6.2.4 Excluded offences
144(1)
6.2.5 Successful attempts
145(1)
6.2.6 Reform
145(1)
6.3 Conspiracy
146(10)
6.3.1 Actus reus of statutory conspiracy
146(3)
6.3.2 Mens rea of statutory conspiracy
149(4)
6.3.3 Common law conspiracy
153(2)
6.3.4 Impossibility
155(1)
6.4 Assisting or encouraging crime
156(13)
6.4.1 Background
156(1)
6.4.2 Liability under the Serious Crime Act 2007
157(2)
6.4.3 Actus reus elements
159(1)
6.4.4 Mens rea elements
159(3)
6.4.5 No requirement for substantive offence to be committed (s 49)
162(1)
6.4.6 Defence of `acting reasonably' (s 50)
162(1)
6.4.7 Defence for victims (s 51)
163(1)
6.4.8 Impossibility
163(1)
6.4.9 Attempt liability
163(1)
6.4.10 Evaluation of the Serious Crime Act 2007
164(3)
Sample essay question
167(1)
Further reading
168(1)
7 Capacity
169(38)
7.1 Children
170(4)
7.1.1 Children under the age of ten
170(1)
7.1.2 Child safety orders
171(1)
7.1.3 Children aged ten and over
171(3)
7.2 Mentally ill persons
174(3)
7.2.1 Unfitness to plead
174(2)
7.2.2 Insanity at time of offence
176(1)
7.2.3 Diminished responsibility
176(1)
7.2.4 Sentencing mentally ill offenders
176(1)
7.3 Vicarious liability
177(5)
7.3.1 Extended meaning of words
178(1)
7.3.2 Delegation principle
179(2)
7.3.3 Reasons for vicarious liability
181(1)
7.3.4 Criticisms of vicarious liability
182(1)
7.4 Corporate liability
182(8)
7.4.1 Exceptions to the general rule of liability
183(1)
7.4.2 The principle of identification
183(5)
7.4.3 Vicarious liability
188(1)
7.4.4 Breach of statutory duty
189(1)
7.5 Corporate manslaughter
190(17)
7.5.1 Previous law
190(2)
7.5.2 Reform of corporate manslaughter
192(1)
7.5.3 Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act 2007
193(2)
7.5.4 Is the Act working?
195(5)
7.5.5 Why make organisations criminally liable for manslaughter?
200(3)
Sample essay question
203(2)
Further reading
205(2)
8 General Defences
207(62)
8.1 Duress
207(19)
8.1.1 Sources of the duress
208(1)
8.1.2 The seriousness of the threat
208(1)
8.1.3 Threats against whom?
209(1)
8.1.4 Imminence of the threat, opportunities to escape and police protection
210(1)
8.1.5 Duress does not exist in the abstract
211(1)
8.1.6 Voluntary exposure to risk of compulsion
212(3)
8.1.7 Should D have resisted the threats?
215(3)
8.1.8 The scope of the defence
218(5)
8.1.9 The development of duress of circumstances
223(3)
8.2 Necessity
226(6)
8.3 Marital coercion
232(1)
8.4 Mistake
232(2)
8.4.1 Mistakes of fact
232(1)
8.4.2 Mistakes of law
233(1)
8.5 Self-defence and related defences
234(15)
8.5.1 The necessity of force
235(4)
8.5.2 The reasonableness of force
239(4)
8.5.3 Intoxication, mistake and self-defence
243(1)
8.5.4 `Grossly disproportionate' force in `householder' cases
244(3)
8.5.5 Should excessive force in homicide reduce murder to manslaughter?
247(2)
8.6 Consent
249(20)
8.6.1 Consent must be real
249(1)
8.6.2 Consent and fraud
249(3)
8.6.3 The scope of consent
252(10)
8.6.4 The impact of the European Convention on Human Rights (1950) and the Human Rights Act 1998
262(4)
Sample essay question
266(1)
Further read ing
267(2)
9 Mental Capacity Defences
269(44)
9.1 Insanity
269(14)
9.1.1 Procedure
269(1)
9.1.2 The special verdict
270(1)
9.1.3 The M'Naghten Rules
270(7)
9.1.4 Situations not covered by the Rules
277(1)
9.1.5 Criticism and reform proposals
278(5)
9.2 Automatism
283(6)
9.2.1 What is automatism?
283(1)
9.2.2 The need for an evidential foundation
283(1)
9.2.3 Extent of involuntariness required
284(2)
9.2.4 Self-induced automatism
286(2)
9.2.5 Reflex actions
9.2.6 Reform
288(1)
9.3 Intoxication
289(24)
9.3.1 Intoxication is no defence if D still formed mens rea
290(1)
9.3.2 Involuntary intoxication
291(3)
9.3.3 Voluntary intoxication
294(7)
9.3.4 `Dutch courage'
301(1)
9.3.5 Intoxication and insanity
301(2)
9.3.6 Intoxication and automatism
303(1)
9.3.7 Intoxicated mistakes
303(1)
9.3.8 Criticism and reform proposals
304(4)
Sample essay questions
308(3)
Further reading
311(2)
PART II SPECIFIC OFFENCES
313(283)
10 Homicide
315(66)
10.1 Actus reus of homicide
315(3)
10.1.1 Human being: birth
315(1)
10.1.2 Human being: death
316(1)
10.1.3 Under the King or Queen's Peace
316(1)
10.1.4 Within any county of the realm
317(1)
10.1.5 The year and a day rule
317(1)
10.2 Murder
318(3)
10.2.1 Intention
318(1)
10.2.2 Grievous bodily harm
319(1)
10.2.3 Procedure in murder trials
319(1)
10.2.4 Mercy killings and euthanasia
320(1)
10.3 Voluntary manslaughter
321(29)
10.3.1 Diminished responsibility
321(14)
10.3.2 Loss of self-control
335(14)
10.3.3 Suicide pacts
349(1)
10.4 Involuntary manslaughter
350(14)
10.4.1 Constructive manslaughter
350(7)
10.4.2 Gross negligence manslaughter
357(1)
10.4.3 Reckless manslaughter
357(6)
10.4.4 Reform
363(1)
10.5 Causing or allowing the death or serious physical harm of a child or vulnerable adult
364(2)
10.6 Causing death by dangerous driving
366(1)
10.7 Infanticide
367(1)
10.8 Offences against a foetus
368(2)
10.8.1 Child destruction
368(1)
10.8.2 Procuring a miscarriage
369(1)
10.9 Reform of the law of homicide
370(11)
10.9.1 The structure of homicide offences
370(1)
10.9.2 First-degree murder
370(1)
10.9.3 Second-degree murder
371(1)
10.9.4 Manslaughter
371(1)
10.9.5 Intention
372(1)
10.9.6 Duress
372(1)
10.9.7 A single offence of criminal homicide?
372(4)
Sample essay questions
376(3)
Further reading
379(2)
11 Non-Fatal Offences Against The Person
381(30)
11.1 Common assault
382(8)
11.1.1 Actus reus of assault
382(2)
11.1.2 Actus reus of battery
384(5)
11.1.3 Mens rea of assault and battery
389(1)
11.2 Section 47
390(5)
11.2.1 Actus reus of s 47
391(1)
11.2.2 Mens rea of s 47
392(1)
11.2.3 Consent and s 47
393(2)
11.3 Section 20
395(4)
11.3.1 Actus reus of s 20
395(2)
11.3.2 Mens rai of s 20
397(2)
11.4 Section 18
399(2)
11.4.1 Actus reus of s 18
399(1)
11.4.2 Mens rea of s 18
399(2)
11.5 Reform
401(4)
11.6 Racially or religiously aggravated assaults
405(1)
11.7 Administering poison
405(6)
11.7.1 Administer
406(1)
11.7.2 Noxious thing
406(1)
11.7.3 Maliciously
407(2)
Sample essay question
409(1)
Further reading
410(1)
12 Sexual Offences
411(32)
12.1 Rape
412(19)
12.1.1 Penetration of the vagina, anus or mouth of another person, with the penis
413(1)
12.1.2 The absence of consent
414(15)
12.1.3 Intent to penetrate
429(1)
12.1.4 Lack of reasonable belief
429(2)
12.1.5 The marital exception to rape
431(1)
12.1.6 Women as defendants
431(1)
12.2 Assault by penetration
431(2)
12.3 Sexual assault
433(3)
12.4 Causing a person to engage in sexual activity
436(1)
12.5 Administering a substance with intent
436(1)
12.6 Committing an offence with intent to commit a sexual offence
437(1)
12.7 Trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence
437(1)
12.8 Other crimes under the Sexual Offences Act 2003
438(5)
Sample essay question
439(1)
Further reading
440(3)
13 Theft
443(40)
13.1 Background
443(2)
13.1.1 Theft
444(1)
13.1.2 The elements of theft
445(1)
13.2 Appropriation
445(12)
13.2.1 Assumption of the rights of an owner
446(1)
13.2.2 Consent to the appropriation
447(1)
13.2.3 The decision in Gomez
448(4)
13.2.4 Consent without deception
452(2)
13.2.5 Appropriation of credit balances
454(2)
13.2.6 Protection of innocent purchasers
456(1)
13.3 Property
457(4)
13.3.1 Things which cannot be stolen
458(1)
13.3.2 Real property
459(1)
13.3.3 Things in action
459(1)
13.3.4 Other intangible property
460(1)
13.4 Belonging to another
461(6)
13.4.1 Possession or control
461(2)
13.4.2 Proprietary right or interest
463(1)
13.4.3 Property received under an obligation
464(2)
13.4.4 Property got by a mistake
466(1)
13.5 Dishonestly
467(7)
13.5.1 Dishonesty
467(2)
13.5.2 The Ghosh test
469(3)
13.5.3 Problems with the Gosh test
472(2)
13.6 With intention to permanently deprive
474(9)
13.6.1 Borrowing or lending
476(1)
13.6.2 Conditional disposition
477(3)
Sample essay question
480(1)
Further reading
481(2)
14 Robbery, Burglary And Other Offences In The Theft Acts
483(40)
14.1 Robbery
483(8)
14.1.1 The actus reus- of robbery
484(1)
14.1.2 Theft as an element of robbery
484(1)
14.1.3 Force or threat of force
485(2)
14.1.4 Force immediately before or at the time of the theft
487(2)
14.1.5 Force in order to steal
489(1)
14.1.6 Mens rea for robbery
489(1)
14.1.7 Possible reform of law of robbery
489(2)
14.2 Burglary
491(6)
14.2.1 The actus reus of burglary
491(1)
14.2.2 Entry
492(1)
14.2.3 Building or part of a building
493(1)
14.2.4 As a trespasser
493(2)
14.2.5 Mens rea of burglary
495(1)
14.2.6 Burglary of a dwelling
495(2)
14.3 Aggravated burglary
497(1)
14.3.1 Has with him
497(1)
14.4 Removal of items from a place open to the public
498(1)
14.4.1 Actus reus of removal of items from a public place
499(1)
14.5 Taking a conveyance without consent
499(3)
14.5.1 Actus reus of taking a conveyance
500(1)
14.5.2 Without consent
501(1)
14.5.3 Conveyance
502(1)
14.5.4 Mens rea of taking a conveyance
502(1)
14.6 Aggravated vehicle-taking
502(2)
14.6.1 Dangerous driving
503(1)
14.6.2 Injury or damage
503(1)
14.7 Abstracting electricity
504(1)
14.8 Blackmail
504(4)
14.8.1 Demand
504(1)
14.8.2 Unwarranted demand
505(1)
14.8.3 Menaces
506(1)
14.8.4 View to gain or loss
507(1)
14.9 Handling stolen goods
508(5)
14.9.1 Goods
509(1)
14.9.2 Stolen
509(1)
14.9.3 Handling
510(1)
14.9.4 Undertaking or assisting
511(1)
14.9.5 Mens rea of handling
512(1)
14.10 Going equipped for stealing
513(3)
14.10.1 Actus reus of going equipped
513(3)
14.10.2 Mens rea of going equipped
516(1)
14.11 Making off without payment
516(7)
14.11.1 Actus reus of making off without payment
516(1)
14.11.2 Mens rea of making off without payment
517(3)
Sample essay question
520(1)
Further reading
521(2)
15 Fraud
523(26)
15.1 Background to the Fraud Act 2006
523(1)
15.2 The need for reform
524(2)
15.2.1 Proposals for reform
525(1)
15.3 Fraud Act 2006
526(1)
15.4 Fraud by false representation
526(8)
15.4.1 False representation
526(4)
15.4.2 False
530(1)
15.4.3 Gain or loss
531(1)
15.4.4 Mens rea of s 2
532(2)
15.5 Fraud by failing to disclose information
534(2)
15.5.1 Legal duty
535(1)
15.5.2 Mens rea of s 3
536(1)
15.6 Fraud by abuse of position
536(4)
15.6.1 Occupies a position
537(1)
15.6.2 Abuse of position
538(1)
15.6.3 Mens rea of s 4
539(1)
15.7 Possession of articles for use in fraud
540(1)
15.7.1 Mens rea at s 6
540(1)
15.8 Making or supplying articles for use in frauds
541(1)
15.8.1 Mens rea of s 7
542(1)
15.9 Obtaining services dishonestly
542(7)
15.9.1 Actus reus of obtaining services dishonestly
543(1)
15.9.2 Mens rea of obtaining services dishonestly
543(3)
Sample essay question
546(2)
Further reading
548(1)
16 Criminal Damage
549(24)
16.1 The basic offence
549(12)
16.1.1 Destroy or damage
550(2)
16.1.2 Property
552(1)
16.1.3 Belonging to another
553(1)
16.1.4 Mens rea of the basic offence
553(4)
16.1.5 Without lawful excuse
557(4)
16.2 Endangering life
561(4)
16.2.1 Danger to life
561(1)
16.2.2 Life not actually endangered
562(1)
16.2.3 Own property
563(1)
16.2.4 Mens rea
563(2)
16.3 Arson
565(1)
16.4 Threats to destroy or damage property
566(1)
16.5 Possessing anything with intent to destroy or damage property
567(1)
16.6 Racially or religiously aggravated criminal damage
567(6)
Sample essay question
570(1)
Further reading
571(2)
17 Public Order Offences
573(23)
17.1 Riot
573(3)
17.1.1 The actus reus of riot
574(1)
17.1.2 Mens rea of riot
575(1)
17.1.3 Trial and penalty
576(1)
17.2 Violent disorder
576(2)
17.2.1 Present together
576(1)
17.2.2 Mens rea of violent disorder
577(1)
17.2.3 Comparison with riot
577(1)
17.2.4 Trial and penalty
578(1)
17.3 Affray
578(2)
17.3.1 Actus reus of affray
578(1)
17.3.2 Mens rea ot affray
579(1)
17.3.3 Trial and penalty
579(1)
17.4 Fear or provocation of violence
580(2)
17.4.1 Actus of a s 4 offence
580(1)
17.4.2 Threatening, abusive or insulting
581(1)
17.4.3 Towards another person
581(1)
17.4.4 Mens rea of s 4
581(1)
17.5 Intentionally causing harassment, alarm or distress
582(3)
17.5.1 Defences
584(1)
17.6 Harassment, alarm or distress
585(5)
17.6.1 Defences
587(1)
17.6.2 Mens rea of a s 5 offence
588(1)
17.6.3 Section 5 and freedom of expression
588(2)
17.7 Racially or religiously aggravated public order offences
590(6)
Sample essay question
594(1)
Further reading
595(1)
Appendix 1 596(2)
Appendix 2 598(6)
Glossary of legal terminology 604(2)
Index 606