Wind Turbines and Aerodynamics Energy Harvesters [Mīkstie vāki]

, (Tenured faculty in Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, New Zealand), (School of Engineering, The university of British Columbia, Okanag), (College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore),
  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 530 pages, height x width: 229x152 mm, weight: 820 g, Approx. 300 illustrations; Illustrations, unspecified
  • Izdošanas datums: 01-Aug-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Academic Press Inc
  • ISBN-10: 0128171359
  • ISBN-13: 9780128171356
  • Mīkstie vāki
  • Cena: 172,82 €
  • Pievienot vēlmju sarakstam
  • Grāmatu piegādes laiks ir 3-4 nedēļas, ja grāmata ir uz vietas izdevniecības noliktavā. Ja izdevējam nepieciešams publicēt jaunu tirāžu, grāmatas piegāde var aizkavēties.
  • Ielikt grozā
  • Daudzums:
  • Piegādes laiks - 4-6 nedēļas
  • Formāts: Paperback / softback, 530 pages, height x width: 229x152 mm, weight: 820 g, Approx. 300 illustrations; Illustrations, unspecified
  • Izdošanas datums: 01-Aug-2019
  • Izdevniecība: Academic Press Inc
  • ISBN-10: 0128171359
  • ISBN-13: 9780128171356

Wind Turbines and Aerodynamics Energy Harvesters not only presents the most research-focused resource on aerodynamic energy harvesters, but also provides a detailed review on aeroacoustics characteristics. The book considers all developing aspects of 3D printed miniature and large-size Savonious wind harvesters, while also introducing and discussing bladeless and aeroelastic harvesters. Following with a review of Off-shore wind turbine aerodynamics modeling and measurements, the book continues the discussion by comparing the numerical codes for floating offshore wind turbines. Each chapter contains a detailed analysis and numerical and experimental case studies that consider recent research design, developments, and their application in practice.

Written by an experienced, international team in this cross-disciplinary field, the book is an invaluable reference for wind power engineers, technicians and manufacturers, as well as researchers examining one of the most promising and efficient sources of renewable energy.

  • Offers numerical models and case studies by experienced authors in this field
  • Contains an overview and analysis of the latest research
  • Explores 3D printing technology and the production of wind harvesters for real applications
  • Includes, and uses, ANSYS FLUENT case files
1 General introduction to wind turbines
1.1 Wind: A renewable energy sources
1(3)
1.2 Wind turbine basic concepts and classifications
4(4)
1.3 Aerodynamics and turbulence
8(6)
1.4 Betz limit
14(4)
1.5 Concluding remarks
18(5)
References
19(1)
Further reading
20(3)
2 3D-printed miniature Savonious wind harvester
2.1 Foregoing studies on Savonious wind turbines
23(5)
2.2 Design and manufacturing of miniature wind harvesters
28(8)
2.2.1 Model A
29(1)
2.2.2 Model B
29(1)
2.2.3 Model C
30(1)
2.2.4 Model D
30(1)
2.2.5 Model E
30(1)
2.2.6 Model F
30(1)
2.2.7 Model G
30(1)
2.2.8 Model H
30(1)
2.2.9 Model I
31(1)
2.2.10 Model J
31(1)
2.2.11 Air-driven energy harvester supports
31(2)
2.2.12 Electromagnetic convertor
33(1)
2.2.13 Step height platform
33(3)
2.3 Wind tunnel tests and measurements
36(1)
2.4 CFD study of the miniature wind harvesters
37(8)
2.5 Static and dynamic performances of the miniature wind harvesters
45(2)
2.6 Optimum design of the miniature wind harvesters
47(73)
2.6.1 Effect of the blade number N
55(9)
2.6.2 Effect of the energy harvester geometric size (SR)
64(3)
2.6.3 Effect of the energy harvester aspect ratio (AR)
67(4)
2.6.4 Effect of types of energy harvester central part
71(5)
2.6.5 Effect of energy harvester end plates
76(3)
2.6.6 Effect of the energy harvester orientation
79(2)
2.6.7 Combined effect of the harvester orientation with other critical parameter
81(21)
2.6.8 Effect of the blade shape profiles
102(18)
2.7 Concluding remarks
120(3)
Appendix A Energy harvester model design
123(14)
Harvester A
123(1)
Harvester B
124(2)
Harvester C
126(1)
Harvester D
127(2)
Harvester E
129(1)
Harvester F
130(2)
Harvester G
132(1)
Harvester H
133(2)
Harvester I
135(1)
Harvester J
136(1)
Appendix B Wind tunnel results for preliminary parametric study
137(19)
Harvester A
137(1)
Harvester B
138(2)
Harvester C
140(2)
Harvester D
142(2)
Harvester E
144(2)
Harvester F
146(2)
Harvester G
148(2)
Harvester H
150(2)
Harvester I
152(2)
Harvester J
154(2)
Appendix C Wind tunnel results for harvester orientation case study
156(17)
Harvester B (`anti-clockwise' orientation)
156(1)
Harvester C (`anti-clockwise' orientation)
157(1)
Harvester D (`anti-clockwise' orientation)
157(1)
Harvester E (`anti-clockwise' orientation)
158(1)
Harvester F (`anti-clockwise' orientation)
158(1)
Harvester G (`anti-clockwise' orientation)
159(1)
Harvester H (`anti-clockwise' orientation)
159(1)
Harvester I (`anti-clockwise' orientation)
160(1)
References
160(4)
Further reading
164(9)
3 Savious wind turbine above a bluff-body
3.1 Overview of methodology
173(8)
3.2 Wind tunnel and tow tests
181(18)
3.2.1 Wind tunnel tests
184(15)
3.3 CFD modelling and analysis
199(46)
3.3.1 Simulation of driving test conditions
212(28)
3.3.2 Parametric simulation results
240(5)
3.4 Empirical models
245(15)
3.5 Concluding remarks
260(4)
3.5.1 Challenges and future researches
262(2)
A Appendix D
264(77)
A.1 Simulation settings for determining step height in wind tunnel
264(5)
A.2 Simulation settings for determining optimum turbine position of driving test rig
269(11)
A.3 Simulation settings for validating with Sana's experiment
280(14)
A.4 Simulation settings for validating with driving test
294(14)
A.5 Simulation settings for parametric study of a generic turbine above a bluff body
308(26)
References
334(3)
Further reading
337(4)
4 Bladeless wind power harvester and aeroelastic harvester
4.1 Bladeless electromagnetic energy harvester driven by air- and water-flow
341(16)
4.1.1 Measurement configurations and design parameters
346(1)
4.1.2 Experimental results
347(9)
4.1.3 Summary
356(1)
4.2 Aero-elastic-piezo-electric energy harvester
357(16)
4.2.1 Measurement of configurations and design parameters
358(3)
4.2.2 Experimental results
361(6)
4.2.3 Concluding remarks
367(1)
References
368(5)
5 Offshore wind turbine aerodynamics modelling and measurements
5.1 Historical perspective
373(4)
5.2 Environmental and energy issues and concerns
377(2)
5.2.1 Visual and psychosomatic impact
377(1)
5.2.2 Grid connectivity
377(1)
5.2.3 Influence on energy security
377(1)
5.2.4 Influence on electricity price
378(1)
5.2.5 Environmental impact
378(1)
5.3 Load analysis and design tools for off-shore wind turbines
379(2)
5.4 Prediction of aerodynamic loads
381(2)
5.4.1 Blade element momentum (BEM) method
383(1)
5.4.2 Acceleration potential method
384(1)
5.4.3 Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods
385(1)
5.5 Prediction of hydrodynamic loads
385(1)
5.5.1 Morison equation
385(1)
5.5.2 Potential flow approach
386(1)
5.6 Prediction of mooring loads
387(1)
5.7 Experimental investigations
388(5)
5.8 Concluding remarks
393(10)
References
395(5)
Further reading
400(3)
6 Analysis codes for floating offshore wind turbines
6.1 BHawC
403(1)
6.2 Bladed
403(1)
6.3 FAST
403(4)
6.4 FLEX5
407(2)
6.5 HAWC2
409(4)
6.6 PHATAS
413(1)
6.7 Other simulation codes/approaches
414(5)
6.8 Future researches on dynamic stall modelling and offshore wind turbine dynamics
419(12)
6.8.1 Dynamic stall modelling for wind turbine applications
419(4)
6.8.2 Offshore wind turbine dynamics
423(2)
6.8.3 Future analysis software for offshore wind turbines
425(1)
References
425(5)
Further reading
430(1)
7 Aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbines and wind farms
7.1 Introduction
431(2)
7.2 Momentum theory
433(2)
7.3 Turbine modelling
435(7)
7.3.1 Blade element momentum (BEM) modelling
436(5)
7.3.2 Vortex methods
441(1)
7.4 Computational flow modelling
442(7)
7.4.1 Actuator models
444(1)
7.4.2 Actuator disc methods
445(2)
7.4.3 Actuator line models
447(1)
7.4.4 Actuator sector model
448(1)
7.5 Wind modelling
449(3)
7.5.1 Standard wind conditions
450(1)
7.5.2 Extreme wind conditions
451(1)
7.6 Wind farm aerodynamics
452(5)
7.7 Summary
457(6)
Acknowledgements
457(1)
References
457(4)
Further reading
461(2)
8 Aeroacoustics of wind turbines
8.1 Introduction
463(1)
8.2 Noise levels
463(3)
8.3 HAWT noise sources
466(3)
8.4 Governing equations
469(1)
8.5 Propagation models
470(4)
8.5.1 Lighthill's acoustic analogy
470(1)
8.5.2 Ffowcs-Williams & Hawkings analogy
471(3)
8.5.3 Parabolic equation models
474(1)
8.6 Empirical prediction methods
474(2)
8.7 Computational flow fields
476(10)
8.7.1 Eddy simulation
476(3)
8.7.2 RANS models
479(1)
8.7.3 Acoustic splitting technique
480(2)
8.7.4 Domain splitting method
482(4)
8.8 Wind farm acoustics
486(1)
8.9 Summary
487(6)
Acknowledgements
488(1)
References
488(3)
Further reading
491(2)
9 Economics, challenges and potential applications of off-shore wind turbines
9.1 Potential application for knocking down hurricanes
493(4)
9.2 Economics and challenges
497(6)
9.2.1 Economics
497(3)
9.2.2 Technical challenges
500(3)
9.3 Wind hybrid systems
503(2)
9.4 Wind power influence on global climate
505
References
505(5)
Further reading
510(1)
Index
511
Dr. Dan Zhao is a tenured faculty in Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Canterbury, New Zealand. He is the director of Master Engineering studies and the Chief Editor of International Journal of Aerospace Engineering; an Associate Editor of 1) AIAA Journal, 2) Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 3) Aerospace Science and Technology. An editorial board member of Progress in Aerospace Sciences and Journal of Thermal Science. All journals are SCI-indexed. After graduated from Cambridge, he worked in London in a high-tech company as a R&D engineer and Singapore University. Currently, Dan is Associate Fellow of AIAA (The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics). Dan's research interests include applying theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches to study porous medium, combustion instability, thermoacoustics, fabric drying, energy conversion, heat and mass transfer, fluid-structure interaction, aeroacoustics, aerodynamics, propulsion and energy harvesting. Dr. Nuomin Han obtained her Bachelor and PhD degrees from National University of Singapore and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore in 2014 and 2017 respectively. Dr. Ernest S. C.Goh, was graduated from Nanyang Technological Universtiy with Bachelor, Master and PhD degrees in 2016. He is currently working in the University of British Columbia-Okanagan Campus. His research interests and experience include numerical simulation and wind tunnel testing of wind turbines. Dr. John Edward Cater was graduated from Monash University with a PhD in 2002. He worked in Queen Mary University London as a lecturer from 2004 to 2008, then joined the university of Auckland, as a senior lecturer. His research includes studying a variety of fluid flows and aeroacoustics. College of Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore